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Strategische Unternehmungsplanung — Strategische UnternehmungsführungThe Core Competence of the Corporation

Strategische Unternehmungsplanung — Strategische Unternehmungsführung: The Core Competence of the... C. K. Pr ahalad · G. Hamel The most powerful way to prevail in global competition is still invisible to many com- panies. During the 1980s, top executives were judged on their ability to restructure, declutter, and delayer their corporations. In the 1990s, they’ll be judged on their ability to identify, cultivate, and exploit the core competencies that make growth possible – indeed, they’ll have to rethink the concept of the corporation itself. Consider the last ten years of GTE and NEC. In the early 1980s, GTE was well posi- tioned to become a major player in the evolving information technology industry. It was active in telecommunications. Its operations spanned a variety of businesses including telephones, switching and transmission systems, digital PABX, semicon- ductors, packet switching, satellites, defense systems, and lighting products. And GTE’s Entertainment Products Group, which produced Sylvania color TVs, had a position in related display technologies. In 1980, GTE’s sales were $ 9.98 billion, and net cash flow was $ 1.73 billion. NEC, in contrast, was much smaller, at $ 3.8 billion in sales. It had a comparable technological base and computer businesses, but it had no experience as an operating telecommunications company. Yet look at http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Strategische Unternehmungsplanung — Strategische UnternehmungsführungThe Core Competence of the Corporation

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Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2006
ISBN
978-3-540-23575-0
Pages
275 –292
DOI
10.1007/3-540-30763-X_14
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

C. K. Pr ahalad · G. Hamel The most powerful way to prevail in global competition is still invisible to many com- panies. During the 1980s, top executives were judged on their ability to restructure, declutter, and delayer their corporations. In the 1990s, they’ll be judged on their ability to identify, cultivate, and exploit the core competencies that make growth possible – indeed, they’ll have to rethink the concept of the corporation itself. Consider the last ten years of GTE and NEC. In the early 1980s, GTE was well posi- tioned to become a major player in the evolving information technology industry. It was active in telecommunications. Its operations spanned a variety of businesses including telephones, switching and transmission systems, digital PABX, semicon- ductors, packet switching, satellites, defense systems, and lighting products. And GTE’s Entertainment Products Group, which produced Sylvania color TVs, had a position in related display technologies. In 1980, GTE’s sales were $ 9.98 billion, and net cash flow was $ 1.73 billion. NEC, in contrast, was much smaller, at $ 3.8 billion in sales. It had a comparable technological base and computer businesses, but it had no experience as an operating telecommunications company. Yet look at

Published: Jan 1, 2006

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