Status and habitat preferences of Uganda cheetahs: an attempt to predict carnivore occurrence based on vegetation structure

Status and habitat preferences of Uganda cheetahs: an attempt to predict carnivore occurrence... In this paper we examine whether the occurrence of cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) in Uganda can be predicted from habitat characteristics extracted from a vegetation map. We first established the status of the cheetah in Uganda through field-interviews that Gros conducted in 1990. Cheetahs occurred almost exclusively in the Karamoja region where we estimated 53–310 individuals. Based on 216 sightings, the average number of adults in all-adults sightings was 1.65 + SD 0.95 and the average number of cubs in family groups 2.5 + SD 1.65. Compared to Graham and Parker's 1965 East African survey, average adult group size was slightly smaller in 1990 and large family groups were rarer. Comparison with Gros 1990 survey showed considerably lower cub-to-adult ratio and percent of observations with cubs in Uganda than in Kenya. A Geographic Information System (GIS) analysis of vegetation structure in areas where cheetahs were observed and in those where none were reported suggested that cheetahs might favor habitats with 25–50% woody cover and grasses of medium height (50–100 cm). A discriminant analysis correctly classified 72.1% of ‘used’ habitats and 70.4% of ‘no-report’ habitats. A logistic regression analysis improved the correct allocation of ‘used’ habitats by 2.2%. Either the discriminant function or the logistic regression, which require only four easily obtainable vegetation characteristics, may help to pinpoint suitable cheetah habitats for conservation purposes. Our approach could be adapted for analyzing habitat suitability for other species of carnivores. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biodiversity and Conservation Springer Journals

Status and habitat preferences of Uganda cheetahs: an attempt to predict carnivore occurrence based on vegetation structure

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/status-and-habitat-preferences-of-uganda-cheetahs-an-attempt-to-KaTU3heRV0
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Life Sciences; Evolutionary Biology; Tree Biology; Plant Sciences
ISSN
0960-3115
eISSN
1572-9710
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1008950114827
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this paper we examine whether the occurrence of cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) in Uganda can be predicted from habitat characteristics extracted from a vegetation map. We first established the status of the cheetah in Uganda through field-interviews that Gros conducted in 1990. Cheetahs occurred almost exclusively in the Karamoja region where we estimated 53–310 individuals. Based on 216 sightings, the average number of adults in all-adults sightings was 1.65 + SD 0.95 and the average number of cubs in family groups 2.5 + SD 1.65. Compared to Graham and Parker's 1965 East African survey, average adult group size was slightly smaller in 1990 and large family groups were rarer. Comparison with Gros 1990 survey showed considerably lower cub-to-adult ratio and percent of observations with cubs in Uganda than in Kenya. A Geographic Information System (GIS) analysis of vegetation structure in areas where cheetahs were observed and in those where none were reported suggested that cheetahs might favor habitats with 25–50% woody cover and grasses of medium height (50–100 cm). A discriminant analysis correctly classified 72.1% of ‘used’ habitats and 70.4% of ‘no-report’ habitats. A logistic regression analysis improved the correct allocation of ‘used’ habitats by 2.2%. Either the discriminant function or the logistic regression, which require only four easily obtainable vegetation characteristics, may help to pinpoint suitable cheetah habitats for conservation purposes. Our approach could be adapted for analyzing habitat suitability for other species of carnivores.

Journal

Biodiversity and ConservationSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 2, 2004

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off