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Stabilization of third-order, single-stage Sigma-Delta modulators

Stabilization of third-order, single-stage Sigma-Delta modulators The issue of stability of higher-order, single-stage Sigma-Delta (ΣΔ) modulators is addressed using a method from nonlinear system theory. As a result, theoretical bounds for the quantizer input of the modulators are derived. A new method for stabilizing the ΣΔ modulators is then presented. It uses the quantizer input bound for possible instability detection. Upon detection of such a state, the highest-order integrator is cut off, effectively reducing the order of the modulator, and thus resulting in a stable system. The method is easily implemented and results in a very good signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and fast return to normal operation compared to other stabilization methods. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Circuits, Systems and Signal Processing Springer Journals

Stabilization of third-order, single-stage Sigma-Delta modulators

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References (18)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 by Birkhäuser
Subject
Engineering; Circuits and Systems; Electrical Engineering; Signal,Image and Speech Processing; Electronics and Microelectronics, Instrumentation
ISSN
0278-081X
eISSN
1531-5878
DOI
10.1007/BF01206680
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The issue of stability of higher-order, single-stage Sigma-Delta (ΣΔ) modulators is addressed using a method from nonlinear system theory. As a result, theoretical bounds for the quantizer input of the modulators are derived. A new method for stabilizing the ΣΔ modulators is then presented. It uses the quantizer input bound for possible instability detection. Upon detection of such a state, the highest-order integrator is cut off, effectively reducing the order of the modulator, and thus resulting in a stable system. The method is easily implemented and results in a very good signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and fast return to normal operation compared to other stabilization methods.

Journal

Circuits, Systems and Signal ProcessingSpringer Journals

Published: Feb 6, 2005

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