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Special Section: Rethinking Art and Aesthetics in the Age of Creative Machines

Special Section: Rethinking Art and Aesthetics in the Age of Creative Machines Philos. Technol. (2017) 30:263–265 DOI 10.1007/s13347-017-0281-3 EDITORIAL NOTES Special Section: Rethinking Art and Aesthetics in the Age of Creative Machines Editor’s Introduction David J. Gunkel Published online: 24 August 2017 Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2017 As machines of various sorts and configurations encroach on human abilities in areas like manufacturing, decision making, communication, transportation, etc., the one remaining bulwark of human exceptionalism appears to be creativity and artistry. But maybe not for long. There are already technologies that can produce what appear to be creative work. There is, for example, Shimon, a marimba-playing jazz-bot from Georgia Tech University that can improvise with human musicians in real time (Hoffman and Weinberg 2011); Experiments in Musical Intelligence or EMI, a PC- based digital composer that can create new classical music scores that are (by some accounts) virtually indistinguishable from the master works of Bach, Beethoven, and Mozart (Cope 2001); The Painting Fool, an algorithmic painter that aspires to be Btaken seriously as a creative artist in its own right^ (Colton 2012, 16); and Narrative Science’s Quill and Automated Insight’s Wordsmith, natural language generation systems that are designed to write original, human-readable stories by drawing down and reassembling data residing in the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy & Technology Springer Journals

Special Section: Rethinking Art and Aesthetics in the Age of Creative Machines

Philosophy & Technology , Volume 30 (3) – Aug 24, 2017

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Subject
Philosophy; Philosophy of Technology
ISSN
2210-5433
eISSN
2210-5441
DOI
10.1007/s13347-017-0281-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Philos. Technol. (2017) 30:263–265 DOI 10.1007/s13347-017-0281-3 EDITORIAL NOTES Special Section: Rethinking Art and Aesthetics in the Age of Creative Machines Editor’s Introduction David J. Gunkel Published online: 24 August 2017 Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2017 As machines of various sorts and configurations encroach on human abilities in areas like manufacturing, decision making, communication, transportation, etc., the one remaining bulwark of human exceptionalism appears to be creativity and artistry. But maybe not for long. There are already technologies that can produce what appear to be creative work. There is, for example, Shimon, a marimba-playing jazz-bot from Georgia Tech University that can improvise with human musicians in real time (Hoffman and Weinberg 2011); Experiments in Musical Intelligence or EMI, a PC- based digital composer that can create new classical music scores that are (by some accounts) virtually indistinguishable from the master works of Bach, Beethoven, and Mozart (Cope 2001); The Painting Fool, an algorithmic painter that aspires to be Btaken seriously as a creative artist in its own right^ (Colton 2012, 16); and Narrative Science’s Quill and Automated Insight’s Wordsmith, natural language generation systems that are designed to write original, human-readable stories by drawing down and reassembling data residing in the

Journal

Philosophy & TechnologySpringer Journals

Published: Aug 24, 2017

References