Soil water exploitation after fire: competition between Bromus tectorum (cheatgrass) and two native species

Soil water exploitation after fire: competition between Bromus tectorum (cheatgrass) and two... Causes for the widespread abundance of the alien grass Bromus tectorum (cheatgrass) after fire in semiarid areas of western North America may include: (1) utilization of resources freed by the removal of fireintolerant plants; and (2) successful competition between B. tectorum and individual plants that survive fire. On a site in northwestern Nevada (USA), measurements of soil water content, plant water potential, aboveground biomass production, water use efficiency, and B. tectorum tiller density were used to determine if B. tectorum competes with either of two native species ( Stipa comata and Chrysothamnus viscidiflorus ) or simply uses unclaimed resources. Soil water content around native species occurring with B. tectorum was significantly lower ( P <0.05) than around individuals without B. tectorum nearby. Native species had significantly more negative plant water potential when they occurred with B. tectorum . Aboveground biomass was significantly higher for native species without B. tectorum . However, the carbon isotope ratio of leaves for native species with B. tectorum was not significantly different from individuals without B. tectorum . Thus, B. tectorum competes with native species for soil water and negatively affects their wate status and productivity, but the competition for water does not affect water use efficiency of the native species. These adverse effects of B. tectorum competition on the productivity and water status of native species are also evident at 12 years after a fire. This competitive ability of B. tectorum greatly enhances its capability to exploit soil resources after fire and to enhance its status in the community. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Oecologia Springer Journals

Soil water exploitation after fire: competition between Bromus tectorum (cheatgrass) and two native species

Oecologia, Volume 83 (1) – May 1, 1990

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/soil-water-exploitation-after-fire-competition-between-bromus-tectorum-Sgoe9cQ2Fa
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1990 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Life Sciences; Ecology; Plant Sciences
ISSN
0029-8549
eISSN
1432-1939
D.O.I.
10.1007/BF00324626
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Causes for the widespread abundance of the alien grass Bromus tectorum (cheatgrass) after fire in semiarid areas of western North America may include: (1) utilization of resources freed by the removal of fireintolerant plants; and (2) successful competition between B. tectorum and individual plants that survive fire. On a site in northwestern Nevada (USA), measurements of soil water content, plant water potential, aboveground biomass production, water use efficiency, and B. tectorum tiller density were used to determine if B. tectorum competes with either of two native species ( Stipa comata and Chrysothamnus viscidiflorus ) or simply uses unclaimed resources. Soil water content around native species occurring with B. tectorum was significantly lower ( P <0.05) than around individuals without B. tectorum nearby. Native species had significantly more negative plant water potential when they occurred with B. tectorum . Aboveground biomass was significantly higher for native species without B. tectorum . However, the carbon isotope ratio of leaves for native species with B. tectorum was not significantly different from individuals without B. tectorum . Thus, B. tectorum competes with native species for soil water and negatively affects their wate status and productivity, but the competition for water does not affect water use efficiency of the native species. These adverse effects of B. tectorum competition on the productivity and water status of native species are also evident at 12 years after a fire. This competitive ability of B. tectorum greatly enhances its capability to exploit soil resources after fire and to enhance its status in the community.

Journal

OecologiaSpringer Journals

Published: May 1, 1990

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off