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Sociology of Aging and DeathDeath, Culture, and Aging

Sociology of Aging and Death: Death, Culture, and Aging [This chapter is concerned with understanding the relationship of discourses of death with the social philosophy of Michel Foucault. Foucault’s theoretical tools “make sense” of discourses of death in institutions such as care homes. While our responses to death and dying would seem to be very personal and therefore individually determined, they are, in fact, greatly influenced by the beliefs of individuals and “experts” who work in institutions providing care. Therefore, this chapter not only examines the limitations of bio-medicalized discourses of death and dying but importantly emphasizes the importance of Foucault’s conceptual tools to methodologically interrogate how death is managed in institutional care. As Giddens points out:] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Sociology of Aging and DeathDeath, Culture, and Aging

Part of the International Perspectives on Aging Book Series (volume 35)
Sociology of Aging and Death — Nov 26, 2022

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Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
© The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2022
ISBN
978-3-031-19328-6
Pages
115 –124
DOI
10.1007/978-3-031-19329-3_9
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[This chapter is concerned with understanding the relationship of discourses of death with the social philosophy of Michel Foucault. Foucault’s theoretical tools “make sense” of discourses of death in institutions such as care homes. While our responses to death and dying would seem to be very personal and therefore individually determined, they are, in fact, greatly influenced by the beliefs of individuals and “experts” who work in institutions providing care. Therefore, this chapter not only examines the limitations of bio-medicalized discourses of death and dying but importantly emphasizes the importance of Foucault’s conceptual tools to methodologically interrogate how death is managed in institutional care. As Giddens points out:]

Published: Nov 26, 2022

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