Short sequence repeats in microbial pathogenesis and evolution

Short sequence repeats in microbial pathogenesis and evolution Repetitive DNA is ubiquitous in microbial genomes. Different classes of short sequence repeats (SSRs) have been identified and demonstrated to be generally heterogeneous in a locus-dependent manner, reflected in variation in the number of repeat units present at a given genomic site or by sequence heterogeneity among individual units. Both types of variability can be used to assess intra-species genetic diversity. Repeat variability often affects the coding potential of the region in which the repetitive element is located. This implies that determination of the primary structure of variable numbers of tandem repeats can be used for epidemiological identification purposes, and also for the analysis of gene function. Precise assessment of SSR structure can also generate insight into the regulation of gene expression. Together, DNA repeat analysis in microbial species provides information on both functional and evolutionary aspects of genetic diversity among microbial isolates. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences Springer Journals

Short sequence repeats in microbial pathogenesis and evolution

Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences, Volume 56 (10) – Nov 1, 1999

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/short-sequence-repeats-in-microbial-pathogenesis-and-evolution-SEXjItDRnp
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 by Birkhäuser Verlag Basel,
Subject
Life Sciences; Cell Biology; Biomedicine, general; Life Sciences, general; Biochemistry, general
ISSN
1420-682X
eISSN
1420-9071
DOI
10.1007/s000180050019
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Repetitive DNA is ubiquitous in microbial genomes. Different classes of short sequence repeats (SSRs) have been identified and demonstrated to be generally heterogeneous in a locus-dependent manner, reflected in variation in the number of repeat units present at a given genomic site or by sequence heterogeneity among individual units. Both types of variability can be used to assess intra-species genetic diversity. Repeat variability often affects the coding potential of the region in which the repetitive element is located. This implies that determination of the primary structure of variable numbers of tandem repeats can be used for epidemiological identification purposes, and also for the analysis of gene function. Precise assessment of SSR structure can also generate insight into the regulation of gene expression. Together, DNA repeat analysis in microbial species provides information on both functional and evolutionary aspects of genetic diversity among microbial isolates.

Journal

Cellular and Molecular Life SciencesSpringer Journals

Published: Nov 1, 1999

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off