Root biomass allocation in the world's upland forests

Root biomass allocation in the world's upland forests Because the world's forests play a major role in regulating nutrient and carbon cycles, there is much interest in estimating their biomass. Estimates of aboveground biomass based on well-established methods are relatively abundant; estimates of root biomass based on standard methods are much less common. The goal of this work was to determine if a reliable method to estimate root biomass density for forests could be developed based on existing data from the literature. The forestry literature containing root biomass measurements was reviewed and summarized and relationships between both root biomass density (Mg ha−1) and root:shoot ratios (R/S) as dependent variables and various edaphic and climatic independent variables, singly and in combination, were statistically tested. None of the tested independent variables of aboveground biomass density, latitude, temperature, precipitation, temperature:precipitation ratios, tree type, soil texture, and age had important explanatory value for R/S. However, linear regression analysis showed that aboveground biomass density, age, and latitudinal category were the most important predictors of root biomass density, and together explained 84% of the variation. A comparison of root biomass density estimates based on our equations with those based on use of generalized R/S ratios for forests in the United States indicated that our method tended to produce estimates that were about 20% higher. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Oecologia Springer Journals

Root biomass allocation in the world's upland forests

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/root-biomass-allocation-in-the-world-s-upland-forests-FysoKycErC
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 by Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg
Subject
Life Sciences; Ecology; Plant Sciences; Hydrology/Water Resources
ISSN
0029-8549
eISSN
1432-1939
DOI
10.1007/s004420050201
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Because the world's forests play a major role in regulating nutrient and carbon cycles, there is much interest in estimating their biomass. Estimates of aboveground biomass based on well-established methods are relatively abundant; estimates of root biomass based on standard methods are much less common. The goal of this work was to determine if a reliable method to estimate root biomass density for forests could be developed based on existing data from the literature. The forestry literature containing root biomass measurements was reviewed and summarized and relationships between both root biomass density (Mg ha−1) and root:shoot ratios (R/S) as dependent variables and various edaphic and climatic independent variables, singly and in combination, were statistically tested. None of the tested independent variables of aboveground biomass density, latitude, temperature, precipitation, temperature:precipitation ratios, tree type, soil texture, and age had important explanatory value for R/S. However, linear regression analysis showed that aboveground biomass density, age, and latitudinal category were the most important predictors of root biomass density, and together explained 84% of the variation. A comparison of root biomass density estimates based on our equations with those based on use of generalized R/S ratios for forests in the United States indicated that our method tended to produce estimates that were about 20% higher.

Journal

OecologiaSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 6, 1997

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off