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Robots, Jobs, Taxes, and Responsibilities

Robots, Jobs, Taxes, and Responsibilities Philos. Technol. (2017) 30:1–4 DOI 10.1007/s13347-017-0257-3 EDITOR LETTER Luciano Floridi Published online: 14 March 2017 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2017 AI and robots continue to make news. Alarmist headlines used to be about some kind of Terminator developing in the future to dominate and enslave us, like an inferior species. They are now about tireless machines that, like enslaved persons, will make us redundant, replacing and outperforming us more efficiently and cheaply than we can ever be. This master-slave dialectics is not science fiction. On the 16th of February 1 2 of a resolution 2017, the plenary session of the European Parliament voted in favour to create a new ethical-legal framework according to which robots may qualify as Belectronic persons^. The Commission does not have to follow the Parliament’s recommendations but, if it refuses, it will have to explain why. The following day, on the 17th of February, in an interview with Quartz, Bill Gates, Microsoft co-founder, suggested that there should be a tax on robots. Regulating robots is a very reasonable idea. Today, we live onlife, spending increasing amount of time inside the infosphere. In this digital ocean, robots are the real natives: we scuba dive, they are http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy & Technology Springer Journals

Robots, Jobs, Taxes, and Responsibilities

Philosophy & Technology , Volume 30 (1) – Mar 14, 2017

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht
Subject
Philosophy; Philosophy of Technology
ISSN
2210-5433
eISSN
2210-5441
DOI
10.1007/s13347-017-0257-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Philos. Technol. (2017) 30:1–4 DOI 10.1007/s13347-017-0257-3 EDITOR LETTER Luciano Floridi Published online: 14 March 2017 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2017 AI and robots continue to make news. Alarmist headlines used to be about some kind of Terminator developing in the future to dominate and enslave us, like an inferior species. They are now about tireless machines that, like enslaved persons, will make us redundant, replacing and outperforming us more efficiently and cheaply than we can ever be. This master-slave dialectics is not science fiction. On the 16th of February 1 2 of a resolution 2017, the plenary session of the European Parliament voted in favour to create a new ethical-legal framework according to which robots may qualify as Belectronic persons^. The Commission does not have to follow the Parliament’s recommendations but, if it refuses, it will have to explain why. The following day, on the 17th of February, in an interview with Quartz, Bill Gates, Microsoft co-founder, suggested that there should be a tax on robots. Regulating robots is a very reasonable idea. Today, we live onlife, spending increasing amount of time inside the infosphere. In this digital ocean, robots are the real natives: we scuba dive, they are

Journal

Philosophy & TechnologySpringer Journals

Published: Mar 14, 2017

References