Review of Ecological Engineering Solutions for Rural Non-Point Source Water Pollution Control in Hubei Province, China

Review of Ecological Engineering Solutions for Rural Non-Point Source Water Pollution Control in... Rural non-point source (RNPS) water pollution control is problematic in Hubei Province, which is a typical agricultural region with abundant rainfall and a developed natural surface water network. The concept of best management practices (BMP) originating from the USA has already been introduced with the aim to reduce the application of chemical fertilizers and pesticides, and water and soil loss. However, a comprehensive evaluation of rural wastewater and nutrient reutilization to benefit the rural communities and the environment has not been attempted. To fill this gap, this review paper explores the major contributors of RNPS water pollution in Hubei Province, assesses the status of watercourses and discusses the prevalent ecological engineering techniques including vegetated filter strips (VFS), ecological ditches (ED), constructed wetlands (CW), and biogas plants (BP) with respect to aspects such as water purification, energy generation, and nutrient reduction and recirculation. Findings indicate that RNPS water pollution continuously increased for the past 10 years. Chemical fertilizers, poultry and livestock breeding, aquaculture, and rural living are the major sources of elevated chemical oxygen demand, ammonia–nitrogen, total nitrogen, and total phosphorus loads discharged to receiving watercourses. Finally, ecological engineering technologies such as VFS, ED, CW, and BP are proposed for villages and communities to combat RNPS water pollution. BMP are a promising approach to create a sustainable agricultural system, improve the rural energy consumption structure and living conditions, decrease wastewater discharges, and reduce chemical fertilizer application rate. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Water, Air, Soil Pollution Springer Journals

Review of Ecological Engineering Solutions for Rural Non-Point Source Water Pollution Control in Hubei Province, China

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 by Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht
Subject
Environment; Environment, general; Atmospheric Protection/Air Quality Control/Air Pollution; Waste Water Technology / Water Pollution Control / Water Management / Aquatic Pollution; Soil Science & Conservation; Hydrogeology; Climate Change
ISSN
0049-6979
eISSN
1573-2932
DOI
10.1007/s11270-013-1561-x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Rural non-point source (RNPS) water pollution control is problematic in Hubei Province, which is a typical agricultural region with abundant rainfall and a developed natural surface water network. The concept of best management practices (BMP) originating from the USA has already been introduced with the aim to reduce the application of chemical fertilizers and pesticides, and water and soil loss. However, a comprehensive evaluation of rural wastewater and nutrient reutilization to benefit the rural communities and the environment has not been attempted. To fill this gap, this review paper explores the major contributors of RNPS water pollution in Hubei Province, assesses the status of watercourses and discusses the prevalent ecological engineering techniques including vegetated filter strips (VFS), ecological ditches (ED), constructed wetlands (CW), and biogas plants (BP) with respect to aspects such as water purification, energy generation, and nutrient reduction and recirculation. Findings indicate that RNPS water pollution continuously increased for the past 10 years. Chemical fertilizers, poultry and livestock breeding, aquaculture, and rural living are the major sources of elevated chemical oxygen demand, ammonia–nitrogen, total nitrogen, and total phosphorus loads discharged to receiving watercourses. Finally, ecological engineering technologies such as VFS, ED, CW, and BP are proposed for villages and communities to combat RNPS water pollution. BMP are a promising approach to create a sustainable agricultural system, improve the rural energy consumption structure and living conditions, decrease wastewater discharges, and reduce chemical fertilizer application rate.

Journal

Water, Air, Soil PollutionSpringer Journals

Published: Apr 21, 2013

References

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  • Nutrient transport through a vegetative filter strip with subsurface drainage
    Bhattarai, R; Kalita, PK; Patel, MK
  • Vegetative and structural characteristics of agricultural drainages in the Mississippi delta landscapes
    Bouldin, JL; Farris, JL; Moore, MT; Cooper, CM
  • Household biogas use in rural China: a study of opportunities and constraints
    Chen, Y; Yang, G; Sweeney, S; Feng, Y
  • Agricultural pollutant removal by constructed wetlands: implications for water management and design
    Díaz, FJ; Ó Geen, AT; Dahlgren, RA
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    Duchemin, M; Hogue, R
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  • Anaerobic digestion: an intriguing long history in China
    He, PJ
  • Agricultural drainage ditches, their biological importance and functioning
    Herzon, I; Helenius, J

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