Repeated exposures intensify rather than diminish the rewarding effects of amphetamine, morphine, and cocaine

Repeated exposures intensify rather than diminish the rewarding effects of amphetamine, morphine,... 213 98 98 3 3 Bow Tong Lett Department of Psychology Memorial University of Newfoundland A1B 3X9 St. John's Newfoundland Canada Abstract It is commonly believed that repeated exposures diminish the pleasurable effects of drugs and hence that pleasure must have only a minor role in addiction. In six experiments with rats, repeated exposures to amphetamine, morphine, or cocaine were found to enhance the drug-induced rewarding effect as measured by conditioned place preference. Thus, sensitization to the rewarding effect, rather than tolerance, was obtained. Also, cross-sensitization was obtained; exposures to amphetamine enhanced the rewarding effect of morphine and vice versa; similarly, exposures to morphine enhanced the rewarding effect of cocaine. These findings support a new theory: drugs of abuse are addictive because repeated exposures sensitize the central reward mechanism so that drug taking produces a progressively greater reinforcing effect each time it occurs. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychopharmacology Springer Journals

Repeated exposures intensify rather than diminish the rewarding effects of amphetamine, morphine, and cocaine

Psychopharmacology, Volume 98 (3) – Jul 1, 1989

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1989 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Biomedicine; Pharmacology/Toxicology; Psychiatry
ISSN
0033-3158
eISSN
1432-2072
D.O.I.
10.1007/BF00451687
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

213 98 98 3 3 Bow Tong Lett Department of Psychology Memorial University of Newfoundland A1B 3X9 St. John's Newfoundland Canada Abstract It is commonly believed that repeated exposures diminish the pleasurable effects of drugs and hence that pleasure must have only a minor role in addiction. In six experiments with rats, repeated exposures to amphetamine, morphine, or cocaine were found to enhance the drug-induced rewarding effect as measured by conditioned place preference. Thus, sensitization to the rewarding effect, rather than tolerance, was obtained. Also, cross-sensitization was obtained; exposures to amphetamine enhanced the rewarding effect of morphine and vice versa; similarly, exposures to morphine enhanced the rewarding effect of cocaine. These findings support a new theory: drugs of abuse are addictive because repeated exposures sensitize the central reward mechanism so that drug taking produces a progressively greater reinforcing effect each time it occurs.

Journal

PsychopharmacologySpringer Journals

Published: Jul 1, 1989

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