Reinstatement of drug-seeking behavior produced by heroin-predictive environmental stimuli

Reinstatement of drug-seeking behavior produced by heroin-predictive environmental stimuli The current study examined whether stimuli predictive of heroin availability were capable of inducing a relapse of drug-seeking behavior in an operant runway task. Olfactory stimuli (orange and almond food extract) served as discriminative cues about the availability (S+) or unavailability (S–) of heroin reinforcement (a single 0.1 mg/kg IV infusion) in the goal box of a straight arm runway. Following discrimination training, the running response was extinguished in the absence of the olfactory cues. On a single trial, the discriminative stimuli were then tested for their ability to reinstate running behavior prior to presentation of the heroin reinforcer. Subjects presented with the S+ on test day took significantly less time to traverse the alley than they did on the final day of extinction, while those subjects presented with the S– on test day continued to run slowly. These results demonstrate, in an animal model of drug self-administration, that environmental discriminative cues can produce a relapse in drug seeking behavior following a period of abstinence. The response-reinstating properties of the S+ odor were unaltered by pretreatment with any of three doses of haloperidol (0.0, 0.15 or 0.3 mg/kg IP), suggesting that the motivating properties of heroin-predictive stimuli or cues remain intact during dopamine receptor antagonism. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychopharmacology Springer Journals

Reinstatement of drug-seeking behavior produced by heroin-predictive environmental stimuli

Psychopharmacology, Volume 131 (1) – May 1, 1997

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 by Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg
Subject
Legacy
ISSN
0033-3158
eISSN
1432-2072
D.O.I.
10.1007/s002130050269
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The current study examined whether stimuli predictive of heroin availability were capable of inducing a relapse of drug-seeking behavior in an operant runway task. Olfactory stimuli (orange and almond food extract) served as discriminative cues about the availability (S+) or unavailability (S–) of heroin reinforcement (a single 0.1 mg/kg IV infusion) in the goal box of a straight arm runway. Following discrimination training, the running response was extinguished in the absence of the olfactory cues. On a single trial, the discriminative stimuli were then tested for their ability to reinstate running behavior prior to presentation of the heroin reinforcer. Subjects presented with the S+ on test day took significantly less time to traverse the alley than they did on the final day of extinction, while those subjects presented with the S– on test day continued to run slowly. These results demonstrate, in an animal model of drug self-administration, that environmental discriminative cues can produce a relapse in drug seeking behavior following a period of abstinence. The response-reinstating properties of the S+ odor were unaltered by pretreatment with any of three doses of haloperidol (0.0, 0.15 or 0.3 mg/kg IP), suggesting that the motivating properties of heroin-predictive stimuli or cues remain intact during dopamine receptor antagonism.

Journal

PsychopharmacologySpringer Journals

Published: May 1, 1997

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