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Reimagining the European FamilyRussian German Immigration and Imagined Families

Reimagining the European Family: Russian German Immigration and Imagined Families [As indicated in the previous chapter, the contrast between legal and illegal migration and immigration—the possession of papers and citizenship—can open a gulf that separates the life experiences represented in the literature and film about the new “Europe” and the reconfigured family, be it imagined or practiced. Conversely, female figures living in legal immigration can just as well be victimized despite the color of their passport. The historical relationship between “sending” and “receiving” states exerts a significant influence over attitudes toward migration and immigration. Colonialism, military allegiances, and economic interdependence constitute their own chapter in transnational historical interactions. The reasons for legalizing immigration for certain ethnic groups are often specific to the national history of the receiving nation. Although gender differences in parenting roles governed the discussion of fiction and film in the preceding chapters, the focus in this section will be on the specific national histories that involve the role of the Cold War, the dominance of the former Soviet Union in the GDR, and the challenges wrought by the fall of the Berlin Wall for the united German-German history and its encounters with the fall of communism.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Reimagining the European FamilyRussian German Immigration and Imagined Families

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Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan US
Copyright
© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Nature America Inc. 2013
ISBN
978-1-349-47585-8
Pages
83 –107
DOI
10.1057/9781137371843_4
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[As indicated in the previous chapter, the contrast between legal and illegal migration and immigration—the possession of papers and citizenship—can open a gulf that separates the life experiences represented in the literature and film about the new “Europe” and the reconfigured family, be it imagined or practiced. Conversely, female figures living in legal immigration can just as well be victimized despite the color of their passport. The historical relationship between “sending” and “receiving” states exerts a significant influence over attitudes toward migration and immigration. Colonialism, military allegiances, and economic interdependence constitute their own chapter in transnational historical interactions. The reasons for legalizing immigration for certain ethnic groups are often specific to the national history of the receiving nation. Although gender differences in parenting roles governed the discussion of fiction and film in the preceding chapters, the focus in this section will be on the specific national histories that involve the role of the Cold War, the dominance of the former Soviet Union in the GDR, and the challenges wrought by the fall of the Berlin Wall for the united German-German history and its encounters with the fall of communism.]

Published: Oct 28, 2015

Keywords: Gender Role; Police Officer; Ethnic Identity; Female Character; German Family

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