Recalcitrant polysaccharide degradation by novel oxidative biocatalysts

Recalcitrant polysaccharide degradation by novel oxidative biocatalysts The classical hydrolytic mechanism for the degradation of plant polysaccharides by saprophytic microorganisms has been reconsidered after the recent landmark discovery of a new class of oxidases termed lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs). LPMOs are of increased biotechnological interest due to their implication in lignocellulosic biomass decomposition for the production of biofuels and high-value chemicals. They act on recalcitrant polysaccharides by a combination of hydrolytic and oxidative function, generating oxidized and non-oxidized chain ends. They are copper-dependent and require molecular oxygen and an external electron donor for their proper function. In this review, we present the recent findings concerning the mechanism of action of these oxidative enzymes and identify issues and questions to be addressed in the future. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology Springer Journals

Recalcitrant polysaccharide degradation by novel oxidative biocatalysts

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 by Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg
Subject
Life Sciences; Microbiology; Microbial Genetics and Genomics; Biotechnology
ISSN
0175-7598
eISSN
1432-0614
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00253-013-5197-y
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The classical hydrolytic mechanism for the degradation of plant polysaccharides by saprophytic microorganisms has been reconsidered after the recent landmark discovery of a new class of oxidases termed lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs). LPMOs are of increased biotechnological interest due to their implication in lignocellulosic biomass decomposition for the production of biofuels and high-value chemicals. They act on recalcitrant polysaccharides by a combination of hydrolytic and oxidative function, generating oxidized and non-oxidized chain ends. They are copper-dependent and require molecular oxygen and an external electron donor for their proper function. In this review, we present the recent findings concerning the mechanism of action of these oxidative enzymes and identify issues and questions to be addressed in the future.

Journal

Applied Microbiology and BiotechnologySpringer Journals

Published: Aug 31, 2013

References

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