Rapid PCR-RFLP method for discrimination of imported and domestic mackerel

Rapid PCR-RFLP method for discrimination of imported and domestic mackerel With the ever-decreasing domestic fishery catch of Japanese mackerel Scomber japonicus, alternative Atlantic mackerel Scomber scombrus has been increasingly imported and currently accounts for approximately 34% of mackerel consumption in Japan. As there is no morphologic difference between the species after removal of their skin, not only fresh and frozen fillets but also processed seafood of S. scombrus are frequently marketed with mislabeling as S. japonicus. In this study, a rapid and reliable polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis was developed to discriminate imported mackerel S. scombrus and domestic mackerel S. japonicus. PCR amplification for the nuclear 5S ribosomal DNA nontranscribed spacer was performed using Scomber-specific primers. Direct digestions of the PCR products using either PvuII or HaeIII restriction enzymes generated species-specific profiles, indicating that both enzymes enable the accurate identification of S. scombrus and S. japonicus. This robust and reproducible method can serve as molecular-based routine food inspection program to enforce labeling regulations. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Marine Biotechnology Springer Journals

Rapid PCR-RFLP method for discrimination of imported and domestic mackerel

Marine Biotechnology, Volume 7 (6) – Jun 4, 2005

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.
Subject
Life Sciences; Freshwater & Marine Ecology; Microbiology; Zoology; Engineering, general
ISSN
1436-2228
eISSN
1436-2236
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10126-004-4102-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

With the ever-decreasing domestic fishery catch of Japanese mackerel Scomber japonicus, alternative Atlantic mackerel Scomber scombrus has been increasingly imported and currently accounts for approximately 34% of mackerel consumption in Japan. As there is no morphologic difference between the species after removal of their skin, not only fresh and frozen fillets but also processed seafood of S. scombrus are frequently marketed with mislabeling as S. japonicus. In this study, a rapid and reliable polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis was developed to discriminate imported mackerel S. scombrus and domestic mackerel S. japonicus. PCR amplification for the nuclear 5S ribosomal DNA nontranscribed spacer was performed using Scomber-specific primers. Direct digestions of the PCR products using either PvuII or HaeIII restriction enzymes generated species-specific profiles, indicating that both enzymes enable the accurate identification of S. scombrus and S. japonicus. This robust and reproducible method can serve as molecular-based routine food inspection program to enforce labeling regulations.

Journal

Marine BiotechnologySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 4, 2005

References

  • Authentication of seafood products by DNA patterns
    Bossier, P
  • PCR-RFLP of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase gene: a simple method for discrimination between Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)
    Carrera, E; Garcia, T; Cespedes, A; Gonzalez, I; Fernandez, A; Hernandez, PE; Martin, R

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