Psychopharmacological activity of the active constituents of hashish and some related cannabinoids

Psychopharmacological activity of the active constituents of hashish and some related cannabinoids 213 14 14 3 3 Y. Grunfeld H. Edery Israel Institute for Biological Research Ness-Ziona Israel Summary 1. The psychopharmacological activity of Δ 1 -tetrahydrocannabinol, (I); Δ 1(6) -tetrahydrocannabinol (4′ hexyl), (II); Δ 1(6) -tetrahydrocannabinol, (III); 1-ethoxyhexahydrocannabinol, (IV); 8-ethoxy- iso -hexahydrocannabinol, (V); Δ 1(6) -tetrahydrocannabinolic acid Me ester, Isomer I, (VI); Δ 1(6) -tetrahydrocannabinolic acid Me ester, Isomer II, (VII); cannabigerol, (VIII); Δ 1(6) -tetrahydrocannabinol (3′ hexyl), (IX); cannabichromene, (X); has been examined in a variety of animal species. 2. Compounds (I) and (III) caused severe motor disturbances and a stuporous state in dogs and ptosis, “tameness” and peculiar postural changes in monkeys. In the latter animal, compound (II) elicited similar effects. 3. Compounds (I) and (III) after intraperitoneal but not subcutaneous administration, suppressed the gerbil digging activity; reduced the rat conditioned avoidance response and induced a cataleptoid reaction in mice, rats and gerbils. In addition, compound (I) reduced the performance of mice on the rotating-rod. Both compounds, administered subcutaneously, induced a measurable ataxic gait in rats. 4. Amphetamine reversed the behavioural changes elicited by compounds (I) and (III) in monkeys, as well as the cataleptoid reaction in rats. 5. None of the other compounds provoked observable changes in any of the species studied. 6. It is suggested that Rhesus monkeys might serve as a suitable model for assessing the psychopharmacological activity of active cannabinoids. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychopharmacology Springer Journals

Psychopharmacological activity of the active constituents of hashish and some related cannabinoids

Psychopharmacology, Volume 14 (3) – Jan 1, 1969

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1969 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Biomedicine; Pharmacology/Toxicology; Psychiatry
ISSN
0033-3158
eISSN
1432-2072
D.O.I.
10.1007/BF00404218
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

213 14 14 3 3 Y. Grunfeld H. Edery Israel Institute for Biological Research Ness-Ziona Israel Summary 1. The psychopharmacological activity of Δ 1 -tetrahydrocannabinol, (I); Δ 1(6) -tetrahydrocannabinol (4′ hexyl), (II); Δ 1(6) -tetrahydrocannabinol, (III); 1-ethoxyhexahydrocannabinol, (IV); 8-ethoxy- iso -hexahydrocannabinol, (V); Δ 1(6) -tetrahydrocannabinolic acid Me ester, Isomer I, (VI); Δ 1(6) -tetrahydrocannabinolic acid Me ester, Isomer II, (VII); cannabigerol, (VIII); Δ 1(6) -tetrahydrocannabinol (3′ hexyl), (IX); cannabichromene, (X); has been examined in a variety of animal species. 2. Compounds (I) and (III) caused severe motor disturbances and a stuporous state in dogs and ptosis, “tameness” and peculiar postural changes in monkeys. In the latter animal, compound (II) elicited similar effects. 3. Compounds (I) and (III) after intraperitoneal but not subcutaneous administration, suppressed the gerbil digging activity; reduced the rat conditioned avoidance response and induced a cataleptoid reaction in mice, rats and gerbils. In addition, compound (I) reduced the performance of mice on the rotating-rod. Both compounds, administered subcutaneously, induced a measurable ataxic gait in rats. 4. Amphetamine reversed the behavioural changes elicited by compounds (I) and (III) in monkeys, as well as the cataleptoid reaction in rats. 5. None of the other compounds provoked observable changes in any of the species studied. 6. It is suggested that Rhesus monkeys might serve as a suitable model for assessing the psychopharmacological activity of active cannabinoids.

Journal

PsychopharmacologySpringer Journals

Published: Jan 1, 1969

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