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Privacy in Mobile and Pervasive ComputingPrivacy Implications of Mobile and Pervasive Computing

Privacy in Mobile and Pervasive Computing: Privacy Implications of Mobile and Pervasive Computing [In his seminal 1991 Scientific American article, Mark Weiser already cautioned that “hundreds of computers in every room, all capable of sensing people near them and linked by high-speed networks, have the potential to make totalitarianism up to now seem like sheerest anarchy” [Weiser, 1991]. Chapter 3 presented some of the reasons for this: mobile systems come in highly portable form factors that make it easy to always carry them with us; their powerful communication capabilities encourage data offloading to the cloud; the potential of context awareness and novel low-power sensors make continuous data collection the default; and thriving app ecosystems challenge traditional trust relationships. The vision of pervasive systems furthermore makes it difficult to tell when one is detected and potentially recorded by invisible devices; its focus on understanding user intent drives ever expanding data collection; and the ubiquity of smart devices and environments offers the tantalizing promise of better “managing” and “optimizing” society.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Privacy in Mobile and Pervasive ComputingPrivacy Implications of Mobile and Pervasive Computing

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Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019
ISBN
978-3-031-01358-4
Pages
57 –68
DOI
10.1007/978-3-031-02486-3_4
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[In his seminal 1991 Scientific American article, Mark Weiser already cautioned that “hundreds of computers in every room, all capable of sensing people near them and linked by high-speed networks, have the potential to make totalitarianism up to now seem like sheerest anarchy” [Weiser, 1991]. Chapter 3 presented some of the reasons for this: mobile systems come in highly portable form factors that make it easy to always carry them with us; their powerful communication capabilities encourage data offloading to the cloud; the potential of context awareness and novel low-power sensors make continuous data collection the default; and thriving app ecosystems challenge traditional trust relationships. The vision of pervasive systems furthermore makes it difficult to tell when one is detected and potentially recorded by invisible devices; its focus on understanding user intent drives ever expanding data collection; and the ubiquity of smart devices and environments offers the tantalizing promise of better “managing” and “optimizing” society.]

Published: Jan 1, 2019

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