Prevalence of Same-Sex Behavior and Orientation in England: Results from a National Survey

Prevalence of Same-Sex Behavior and Orientation in England: Results from a National Survey There are few data sources on the prevalence of same-sex sexual orientation in England. We aimed to measure the prevalence of same-sex orientation and behavior in the English general population and assess the impact of enquiry format on reporting. The Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey 2007 used a multi-stage, stratified probability-sampling design (n = 7,403). Two questions addressed sexual orientation and sexual partnership and each had two versions. Version A of the sexual orientation question used “homosexual.” Version B used “gay or lesbian.” Version A of the sexual partnership question required participants who had male and female partners to say which was predominant, while Version B had a midpoint response option: “about equally with men and women.” Participants were randomized between versions. Overall, 5.3% of men and 5.6% of women reported they were not entirely heterosexual. The question using “gay or lesbian” elicited higher (though not statistically significant) reporting of non-heterosexual orientation than the question using “homosexual.” A significantly larger proportion of men and women (96.0 and 96.1%) reported entirely heterosexual partnerships in response to Version A of the partnership question than in response to Version B (94.0 and 92.9%) where Version B asked specifically about “kissing, touching, intercourse, or any other form of sex.” These figures constitute the first national prevalence data on combined sexual orientation and sexual behavior in England, based on a random probability sample of the general population. They demonstrate that people are willing to report their sexual orientation in survey research, but reporting is sensitive to question wording. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Sexual Behavior Springer Journals

Prevalence of Same-Sex Behavior and Orientation in England: Results from a National Survey

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/prevalence-of-same-sex-behavior-and-orientation-in-england-results-txg4Te50ae
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC
Subject
Psychology; Sexual Behavior; Public Health; Social Sciences, general
ISSN
0004-0002
eISSN
1573-2800
DOI
10.1007/s10508-011-9856-8
pmid
21975923
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

There are few data sources on the prevalence of same-sex sexual orientation in England. We aimed to measure the prevalence of same-sex orientation and behavior in the English general population and assess the impact of enquiry format on reporting. The Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey 2007 used a multi-stage, stratified probability-sampling design (n = 7,403). Two questions addressed sexual orientation and sexual partnership and each had two versions. Version A of the sexual orientation question used “homosexual.” Version B used “gay or lesbian.” Version A of the sexual partnership question required participants who had male and female partners to say which was predominant, while Version B had a midpoint response option: “about equally with men and women.” Participants were randomized between versions. Overall, 5.3% of men and 5.6% of women reported they were not entirely heterosexual. The question using “gay or lesbian” elicited higher (though not statistically significant) reporting of non-heterosexual orientation than the question using “homosexual.” A significantly larger proportion of men and women (96.0 and 96.1%) reported entirely heterosexual partnerships in response to Version A of the partnership question than in response to Version B (94.0 and 92.9%) where Version B asked specifically about “kissing, touching, intercourse, or any other form of sex.” These figures constitute the first national prevalence data on combined sexual orientation and sexual behavior in England, based on a random probability sample of the general population. They demonstrate that people are willing to report their sexual orientation in survey research, but reporting is sensitive to question wording.

Journal

Archives of Sexual BehaviorSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 6, 2011

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off