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Pharmacy and Professionalization in the British Empire, 1780–1970West Africa: The Scramble for Professionalization

Pharmacy and Professionalization in the British Empire, 1780–1970: West Africa: The Scramble for... [Post-independence studies of professionalization in West Africa have suggested that the model is of limited value because of the very different circumstances compared to those in Europe and North America. Johnson, for example, suggests that the professions were too dependent on the state to be able to form effective autonomous power bases. Dependence, he argues, was a consequence of the scale of patronage of colonial authorities for professional services: ‘in the absence of a heterogeneous middle class providing sources of demand for professional services, the conditions for professional autonomy are also absent’. Robin Luckham in his study of the Ghanaian legal profession highlights the role of British laws and the transplantation of the British legal system on developments there.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Pharmacy and Professionalization in the British Empire, 1780–1970West Africa: The Scramble for Professionalization

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Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
© The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2021
ISBN
978-3-030-78979-4
Pages
157 –185
DOI
10.1007/978-3-030-78980-0_6
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[Post-independence studies of professionalization in West Africa have suggested that the model is of limited value because of the very different circumstances compared to those in Europe and North America. Johnson, for example, suggests that the professions were too dependent on the state to be able to form effective autonomous power bases. Dependence, he argues, was a consequence of the scale of patronage of colonial authorities for professional services: ‘in the absence of a heterogeneous middle class providing sources of demand for professional services, the conditions for professional autonomy are also absent’. Robin Luckham in his study of the Ghanaian legal profession highlights the role of British laws and the transplantation of the British legal system on developments there.]

Published: Oct 23, 2021

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