Peripheral nerve grafts lacking viable Schwann cells fail to support central nervous system axonal regeneration

Peripheral nerve grafts lacking viable Schwann cells fail to support central nervous system... 221 69 69 2 2 G. V. Smith J. A. Stevenson Department of Anatomy Medical College of Virginia, Virginia Commonwealth University MCV Station Box 709 23298 Richmond VA USA Summary Peripheral nerve grafts were implanted bilaterally into the diencephalon of adult hamsters. One graft segment contained both viable Schwann cells and their basal lamina tubes. The Schwann cell population in the second graft segment was killed by freezing prior to implantation. Seven weeks after graft implantations, the extracranial end of each graft segment was exposed, transected and labelled with a fluorescent tracer substance. One week after the labelling procedure each animal was perfused and the diencephalon and midbrain were examined. Ultrastructural analyses of both types of graft demonstrated the persistence of the Schwann cell-derived basal lamina tubes. Retrogradely labelled neurons were found in all cases in which an intact graft remained in place for two months, but were seen in only one case with a frozen graft. Large numbers of myelinated and unmyelinated axons were seen within the intact grafts, but no axons were found in the previously frozen grafts. These results indicate that lesioned CNS axons are able to regenerate vigorously when provided with an environment which includes viable Schwann cells. But, CNS axons regenerate less well, if at all, when Schwann cells are absent. Further, it appears that Schwann cell-derived basal lamina tubes, when isolated from their parent cells, are insufficient to initiate or sustain CNS axonal regeneration. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Experimental Brain Research Springer Journals

Peripheral nerve grafts lacking viable Schwann cells fail to support central nervous system axonal regeneration

Experimental Brain Research, Volume 69 (2) – Jan 1, 1988

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/peripheral-nerve-grafts-lacking-viable-schwann-cells-fail-to-support-VxB8ZVHAMn
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1988 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Biomedicine; Neurosciences; Neurology
ISSN
0014-4819
eISSN
1432-1106
DOI
10.1007/BF00247575
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

221 69 69 2 2 G. V. Smith J. A. Stevenson Department of Anatomy Medical College of Virginia, Virginia Commonwealth University MCV Station Box 709 23298 Richmond VA USA Summary Peripheral nerve grafts were implanted bilaterally into the diencephalon of adult hamsters. One graft segment contained both viable Schwann cells and their basal lamina tubes. The Schwann cell population in the second graft segment was killed by freezing prior to implantation. Seven weeks after graft implantations, the extracranial end of each graft segment was exposed, transected and labelled with a fluorescent tracer substance. One week after the labelling procedure each animal was perfused and the diencephalon and midbrain were examined. Ultrastructural analyses of both types of graft demonstrated the persistence of the Schwann cell-derived basal lamina tubes. Retrogradely labelled neurons were found in all cases in which an intact graft remained in place for two months, but were seen in only one case with a frozen graft. Large numbers of myelinated and unmyelinated axons were seen within the intact grafts, but no axons were found in the previously frozen grafts. These results indicate that lesioned CNS axons are able to regenerate vigorously when provided with an environment which includes viable Schwann cells. But, CNS axons regenerate less well, if at all, when Schwann cells are absent. Further, it appears that Schwann cell-derived basal lamina tubes, when isolated from their parent cells, are insufficient to initiate or sustain CNS axonal regeneration.

Journal

Experimental Brain ResearchSpringer Journals

Published: Jan 1, 1988

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off