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Pacted Democracy in the Middle EastTunisia: Development and State Formation

Pacted Democracy in the Middle East: Tunisia: Development and State Formation [This chapter lays out the first part of the initial case of Tunisia, which represents a case of successfully pacted (though not consolidated) democracy. It provides the historical context necessary to rebut shallow hypotheses claiming that Tunisians crafted a post-revolutionary democracy after the Jasmine Revolution because they inherited a culture of alleged moderation, or had undergone deep secularization in the preceding decades. Rejecting such Tunisian exceptionalism, it instead contends that Tunisia’s prior development from French colonialism through the regime of Habib Bourguiba did deposit several structural conditions that would later be important for pacting. One was polarization, resulting from the Tunisian party-state’s intolerance to Islamism; another was parity, meaning that both Tunisian Islamists through Ennahda and its democratic opposition were equally weak. In addition, Tunisia also featured a relatively small military, well-organized civil society, and coherent national discourse that allowed all Tunisians to see one another as citizens—but nonetheless did not resolve fundamental disagreements about the role of religion in politics.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Pacted Democracy in the Middle EastTunisia: Development and State Formation

Part of the St Antony's Series Book Series

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Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
© The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2022
ISBN
978-3-030-99239-2
Pages
103 –149
DOI
10.1007/978-3-030-99240-8_4
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[This chapter lays out the first part of the initial case of Tunisia, which represents a case of successfully pacted (though not consolidated) democracy. It provides the historical context necessary to rebut shallow hypotheses claiming that Tunisians crafted a post-revolutionary democracy after the Jasmine Revolution because they inherited a culture of alleged moderation, or had undergone deep secularization in the preceding decades. Rejecting such Tunisian exceptionalism, it instead contends that Tunisia’s prior development from French colonialism through the regime of Habib Bourguiba did deposit several structural conditions that would later be important for pacting. One was polarization, resulting from the Tunisian party-state’s intolerance to Islamism; another was parity, meaning that both Tunisian Islamists through Ennahda and its democratic opposition were equally weak. In addition, Tunisia also featured a relatively small military, well-organized civil society, and coherent national discourse that allowed all Tunisians to see one another as citizens—but nonetheless did not resolve fundamental disagreements about the role of religion in politics.]

Published: May 18, 2022

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