Oxidative stress and insulin action: is there a relationship?

Oxidative stress and insulin action: is there a relationship? Diabetologia (1996) 39:357-363 Diabetologia 9 Springer-Verlag!996 For debate G. Paolisso, D. Giugliano Department of Geriatric Medicine and Metabolic Diseases, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy Free radicals are highly reactive atoms or molecules that have one or more unpaired electrons in their atomic structure. Oxidative damage inflicted by reactive oxygen species is also referred to as 'oxidative stress' [1]. The susceptibility of a given organ or system to oxidative stress is a function of the balance between pro-oxidant factors and those scavenging them [1]. The non-enzymatic, free radical-mediated oxidation of biological molecules, membranes and tissue is associated with a variety of pathological events such as cancer, aging and diabetes mellitus [1]. In diabetes, oxidative stress seems mainly due to both an increased production of plasma free radical concentrations and a sharp reduction of antioxidant defences [1]. Among the causes of enhanced free radical production hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinaemia seem to play a major role. The relationship between oxidative stress and diabetic complications has been extensively investigated. Briefly, oxidative stress has been suggested to be involved in the genesis of both macro- and microangiopathy [2-4]. In contrast, the relationship between oxidative stress and insulin action is a neglected research area. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Diabetologia Springer Journals

Oxidative stress and insulin action: is there a relationship?

Diabetologia, Volume 39 (3) – Mar 1, 1996

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Human Physiology; Internal Medicine; Metabolic Diseases
ISSN
0012-186X
eISSN
1432-0428
D.O.I.
10.1007/BF00418354
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Diabetologia (1996) 39:357-363 Diabetologia 9 Springer-Verlag!996 For debate G. Paolisso, D. Giugliano Department of Geriatric Medicine and Metabolic Diseases, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy Free radicals are highly reactive atoms or molecules that have one or more unpaired electrons in their atomic structure. Oxidative damage inflicted by reactive oxygen species is also referred to as 'oxidative stress' [1]. The susceptibility of a given organ or system to oxidative stress is a function of the balance between pro-oxidant factors and those scavenging them [1]. The non-enzymatic, free radical-mediated oxidation of biological molecules, membranes and tissue is associated with a variety of pathological events such as cancer, aging and diabetes mellitus [1]. In diabetes, oxidative stress seems mainly due to both an increased production of plasma free radical concentrations and a sharp reduction of antioxidant defences [1]. Among the causes of enhanced free radical production hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinaemia seem to play a major role. The relationship between oxidative stress and diabetic complications has been extensively investigated. Briefly, oxidative stress has been suggested to be involved in the genesis of both macro- and microangiopathy [2-4]. In contrast, the relationship between oxidative stress and insulin action is a neglected research area.

Journal

DiabetologiaSpringer Journals

Published: Mar 1, 1996

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