Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Open Data, Data Protection, and Group Privacy

Open Data, Data Protection, and Group Privacy Philos. Technol. (2014) 27:1–3 DOI 10.1007/s13347-014-0157-8 EDITOR LETTER Luciano Floridi Published online: 18 February 2014 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014 The debate on Open Data and Data Protection focuses on individual privacy. How can the latter be protected while taking advantage of the enormous potentialities offered by ever-bigger Open Data and ever-smarter algorithms and applications? The tension is sometimes presented as being asymmetric: between the ethics of privacy and the politics of security. In fact, it is ultimately ethical. Two moral duties need to be reconciled: fostering human rights and improving human welfare. The tension is obvious if one considers medical contexts and biomedical Big Data, for example, where protection of patients’ records and cure or prevention of diseases need to go hand in hand (Howe et al. 2008;Groves etal. 2013). Currently, the balance between these two moral duties is implicitly understood within a classic ontological framework. The beneficiaries of the exercise of the two moral duties are the individual vs. the society to which the individual belongs. At first sight, this may seem unproblematic. We work on the assumption that these are the only two “weights” on the two sides of the scale. Such a framework is not http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy & Technology Springer Journals

Open Data, Data Protection, and Group Privacy

Philosophy & Technology , Volume 27 (1) – Feb 18, 2014

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/open-data-data-protection-and-group-privacy-CZYnL0fiQr
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 by Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht
Subject
Philosophy; Philosophy of Technology
ISSN
2210-5433
eISSN
2210-5441
DOI
10.1007/s13347-014-0157-8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Philos. Technol. (2014) 27:1–3 DOI 10.1007/s13347-014-0157-8 EDITOR LETTER Luciano Floridi Published online: 18 February 2014 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014 The debate on Open Data and Data Protection focuses on individual privacy. How can the latter be protected while taking advantage of the enormous potentialities offered by ever-bigger Open Data and ever-smarter algorithms and applications? The tension is sometimes presented as being asymmetric: between the ethics of privacy and the politics of security. In fact, it is ultimately ethical. Two moral duties need to be reconciled: fostering human rights and improving human welfare. The tension is obvious if one considers medical contexts and biomedical Big Data, for example, where protection of patients’ records and cure or prevention of diseases need to go hand in hand (Howe et al. 2008;Groves etal. 2013). Currently, the balance between these two moral duties is implicitly understood within a classic ontological framework. The beneficiaries of the exercise of the two moral duties are the individual vs. the society to which the individual belongs. At first sight, this may seem unproblematic. We work on the assumption that these are the only two “weights” on the two sides of the scale. Such a framework is not

Journal

Philosophy & TechnologySpringer Journals

Published: Feb 18, 2014

References