Nutritional Impact of a Gluten-Free Casein-Free Diet in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Nutritional Impact of a Gluten-Free Casein-Free Diet in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder We compared anthropometric values, nutrient intake, the Healthy Eating Index and food variety in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), 20 on a gluten-free casein-free (GFCF) diet and 85 on a regular diet in Valencia (Spain) using 3-days food diaries. Those on the GFCF diet had a lower weight, body mass index, and total energy, pantothenic acid, calcium, phosphorus and sodium intake, but a higher intake of fiber, legumes, and vegetables. Further, the GFCF diet group had a better quality of fat intake, but needed supplementation with vitamin D. Randomized controlled trials are required to explore long-term effects of this diet on anthropometric and nutritional status (the focus of our study), but also behavioral symptoms, in children with ASD. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders Springer Journals

Nutritional Impact of a Gluten-Free Casein-Free Diet in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 by Springer Science+Business Media New York
Subject
Psychology; Child and School Psychology; Pediatrics; Neurosciences; Public Health
ISSN
0162-3257
eISSN
1573-3432
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10803-015-2582-7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We compared anthropometric values, nutrient intake, the Healthy Eating Index and food variety in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), 20 on a gluten-free casein-free (GFCF) diet and 85 on a regular diet in Valencia (Spain) using 3-days food diaries. Those on the GFCF diet had a lower weight, body mass index, and total energy, pantothenic acid, calcium, phosphorus and sodium intake, but a higher intake of fiber, legumes, and vegetables. Further, the GFCF diet group had a better quality of fat intake, but needed supplementation with vitamin D. Randomized controlled trials are required to explore long-term effects of this diet on anthropometric and nutritional status (the focus of our study), but also behavioral symptoms, in children with ASD.

Journal

Journal of Autism and Developmental DisordersSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 1, 2015

References

  • Plasma amino acids profiles in children with autism: Potential risk of nutritional deficiencies
    Arnold, GL; Hyman, SL; Mooney, RA; Kirby, RS
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    Bandini, LG; Anderson, SE; Curtin, C; Cermak, S; Evans, EW; Scampini, R
  • Gluten and casein free diets in autism: A study of the effects on food choice and nutrition
    Cornish, E
  • The gluten-free, casein-free diet in autism: Results of a preliminary double blind clinical trial
    Elder, JH; Shankar, M; Shuster, J; Theriaque, D; Burns, S; Sherrill, L
  • Autism interventions: A critical update
    Francis, K
  • Complementary alternative medicine for children with autism: A physician survey
    Golnik, AE; Ireland, M
  • Use of complementary and alternative medicine among children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder
    Hanson, E; Kalish, LA; Bunce, E; Curtis, C; McDaniel, S; Ware, J
  • Reduced bone cortical thickness in boys with autism or autism spectrum disorder
    Hediger, ML; England, LJ; Molloy, CA; Yu, KF; Manning-Courtney, P; Mills, JL
  • Does nutritional intake differ between children with autism spectrum disorders and children with typical development?
    Herndon, AC; DiGuiseppi, C; Johnson, SL; Leiferman, J; Reynolds, A

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