Nitrogen dynamics following slurry injection in maize: soil mineral nitrogen

Nitrogen dynamics following slurry injection in maize: soil mineral nitrogen In northwestern Germany slurry injection below maize (Zea mays L.) seeds is gaining increasing interest of farmers, because of the expected enhanced nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) use efficiencies compared to the usual fertilizing practice. The present study aims to compare the spatial and temporal soil mineral nitrogen (SMN) dynamics for these fertilizing strategies. Field trials with four treatments (unfertilized control, broadcast application + N P mineral starter fertilizer (+MSF), injection and injection + nitrification inhibitor (NI)) were conducted using pig slurry on sandy soil in 2014 and 2015. Soil samples were taken from three soil layers at 30 cm intervals down to 90 cm, and at three positions (below the maize row, 15 and 30 cm distance to the row) at several dates over the growing season. Soil monoliths (15 × 15 × 10 cm) were sampled around the injection zone, and for all other soil zones an auger was used. In 2014 due to heavy rainfall all fertilized N was displaced from the top soil layer of the broadcast treatment until 6-leaf stage, while N displacement was significantly smaller after slurry injection (about 20 kg SMN ha−1 more in top layer). The lateral movement of injected slurry N was negligible. In 2015 almost no displacement of fertilized N out of the top soil layer occurred independently of treatments, because of lower rainfall. The release of slurry N was delayed following broadcast application and large SMN concentrations were detected in the injection zones until 10-leaf stage. The addition of a NI resulted in significantly increased ammonium N concentrations in the injection zone throughout the early growth stages [+46 % (2014) and +12 % (2015) at 6-leaf stage]. Thus, N displacement was delayed in 2014 and in 2015 at 6-leaf stage increased SMN concentrations (+1/3 with NI) were found around the slurry band. Due to slurry injection, especially when combined with a nitrification inhibitor, the applied nitrogen is located in a soil zone with better spatial availability for plant roots compared to broadcast application and the risk of nitrate leaching is significantly reduced. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems Springer Journals

Nitrogen dynamics following slurry injection in maize: soil mineral nitrogen

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/nitrogen-dynamics-following-slurry-injection-in-maize-soil-mineral-pgu6UDiBUA
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 by Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht
Subject
Life Sciences; Agriculture
ISSN
1385-1314
eISSN
1573-0867
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10705-016-9799-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In northwestern Germany slurry injection below maize (Zea mays L.) seeds is gaining increasing interest of farmers, because of the expected enhanced nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) use efficiencies compared to the usual fertilizing practice. The present study aims to compare the spatial and temporal soil mineral nitrogen (SMN) dynamics for these fertilizing strategies. Field trials with four treatments (unfertilized control, broadcast application + N P mineral starter fertilizer (+MSF), injection and injection + nitrification inhibitor (NI)) were conducted using pig slurry on sandy soil in 2014 and 2015. Soil samples were taken from three soil layers at 30 cm intervals down to 90 cm, and at three positions (below the maize row, 15 and 30 cm distance to the row) at several dates over the growing season. Soil monoliths (15 × 15 × 10 cm) were sampled around the injection zone, and for all other soil zones an auger was used. In 2014 due to heavy rainfall all fertilized N was displaced from the top soil layer of the broadcast treatment until 6-leaf stage, while N displacement was significantly smaller after slurry injection (about 20 kg SMN ha−1 more in top layer). The lateral movement of injected slurry N was negligible. In 2015 almost no displacement of fertilized N out of the top soil layer occurred independently of treatments, because of lower rainfall. The release of slurry N was delayed following broadcast application and large SMN concentrations were detected in the injection zones until 10-leaf stage. The addition of a NI resulted in significantly increased ammonium N concentrations in the injection zone throughout the early growth stages [+46 % (2014) and +12 % (2015) at 6-leaf stage]. Thus, N displacement was delayed in 2014 and in 2015 at 6-leaf stage increased SMN concentrations (+1/3 with NI) were found around the slurry band. Due to slurry injection, especially when combined with a nitrification inhibitor, the applied nitrogen is located in a soil zone with better spatial availability for plant roots compared to broadcast application and the risk of nitrate leaching is significantly reduced.

Journal

Nutrient Cycling in AgroecosystemsSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 3, 2016

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off