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Neuroanatomy of pseudobulbar affect

Neuroanatomy of pseudobulbar affect Pseudobulbar affect (PBA) is defined as episodes of involuntary crying, laughing, or both in the absence of a matching subjective mood state. This neuropsychiatric syndrome can be found in a number of neurological disorders including multiple sclerosis (MS). The aim of this study was to identify neuroanatomical correlates of PBA in multiple sclerosis (MS) using a case-control 1.5T MRI study. MS patients with (n = 14) and without (n = 14) PBA were matched on demographic, disease course, and disability variables. Comorbid psychiatric disorders including depressive and anxiety disorders were absent. Hypo- and hyperintense lesion volumes plus measurements of atrophy were obtained and localized anatomically according to parcellated brain regions. Between-group statistical comparisons were undertaken with α set at 0.01 for the primary analysis. Discrete differences in lesion volume were noted in six regions: Brainstem hypointense lesions, bilateral inferior parietal and medial inferior frontal hyperintense lesions, and right medial superior frontal hyperintense lesions were all significantly higher in the PBA group. A logistic regression model identified four of these variables (brainstem hypointense, left inferior parietal hyperintense, and left and right medial inferior frontal hyperintense lesion volumes) that accounted for 70% of the variance when it came to explaining the presence of PBA. In conclusion, MS patients with PBA have a distinct distribution of brain lesions when compared to a matched MS sample without PBA. The lesion data support a widely-dispersed neural network involving frontal, parietal, and brainstem regions in the pathophysiology of PBA. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Neurology Springer Journals

Neuroanatomy of pseudobulbar affect

Journal of Neurology , Volume 255 (3) – Feb 26, 2008

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 by Steinkopff-Verlag
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Neurology; Neurosciences; Neuroradiology
ISSN
0340-5354
eISSN
1432-1459
DOI
10.1007/s00415-008-0685-1
pmid
18297331
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Pseudobulbar affect (PBA) is defined as episodes of involuntary crying, laughing, or both in the absence of a matching subjective mood state. This neuropsychiatric syndrome can be found in a number of neurological disorders including multiple sclerosis (MS). The aim of this study was to identify neuroanatomical correlates of PBA in multiple sclerosis (MS) using a case-control 1.5T MRI study. MS patients with (n = 14) and without (n = 14) PBA were matched on demographic, disease course, and disability variables. Comorbid psychiatric disorders including depressive and anxiety disorders were absent. Hypo- and hyperintense lesion volumes plus measurements of atrophy were obtained and localized anatomically according to parcellated brain regions. Between-group statistical comparisons were undertaken with α set at 0.01 for the primary analysis. Discrete differences in lesion volume were noted in six regions: Brainstem hypointense lesions, bilateral inferior parietal and medial inferior frontal hyperintense lesions, and right medial superior frontal hyperintense lesions were all significantly higher in the PBA group. A logistic regression model identified four of these variables (brainstem hypointense, left inferior parietal hyperintense, and left and right medial inferior frontal hyperintense lesion volumes) that accounted for 70% of the variance when it came to explaining the presence of PBA. In conclusion, MS patients with PBA have a distinct distribution of brain lesions when compared to a matched MS sample without PBA. The lesion data support a widely-dispersed neural network involving frontal, parietal, and brainstem regions in the pathophysiology of PBA.

Journal

Journal of NeurologySpringer Journals

Published: Feb 26, 2008

References