Necrotizing fasciitis after a honey bee sting

Necrotizing fasciitis after a honey bee sting Necrotizing soft-tissue infections such as necrotizing fasciitis continue to have a high morbidity and mortality. More and more, these difficult cases are being referred to burn centers for specialized wound and critical care treatment. The case of a necrotizing soft-tissue infection after a honeybee sting is reported. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first documented case of necrotizing fasciitis caused by invasive group A Streptococcus from a bee sting. A 56-year-old man was stung by a bee in the left upper gluteal region. The sting was removed by the patient. Within hours, erythema, swelling, itching, and pain developed. On day 7, after the bee sting, the patient was admitted to a general surgery department with progressive skin and soft-tissue necrosis around the hip and the upper left leg. Because of the rapidly deteriorating condition, the patient was referred to our burn ICU with the picture of a progressive necrotizing fasciitis. The skin necrosis required immediate epifascial necrectomy. Additionally local therapy with topical antiseptics was performed. The surface was temporarily covered with xenograft, definitive coverage was achieved with autologuous skin graft transplantation. Advancements in wound care and critical care, which have become standard in the treatment protocols of patients with necrotizing soft-tissue infections, have markedly improved the prognosis. However, these infections continue to be a source of high morbidity and mortality and significant healthcare resource consumption. These challenging patients are best served with prompt diagnosis, immediate radical surgical debridement, and aggressive critical care management. Referral to a burn center may help to provide best possible surgical intervention, wound care, and critical care management. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Plastic Surgery Springer Journals

Necrotizing fasciitis after a honey bee sting

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Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Plastic Surgery
ISSN
0930-343X
eISSN
1435-0130
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00238-007-0130-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Necrotizing soft-tissue infections such as necrotizing fasciitis continue to have a high morbidity and mortality. More and more, these difficult cases are being referred to burn centers for specialized wound and critical care treatment. The case of a necrotizing soft-tissue infection after a honeybee sting is reported. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first documented case of necrotizing fasciitis caused by invasive group A Streptococcus from a bee sting. A 56-year-old man was stung by a bee in the left upper gluteal region. The sting was removed by the patient. Within hours, erythema, swelling, itching, and pain developed. On day 7, after the bee sting, the patient was admitted to a general surgery department with progressive skin and soft-tissue necrosis around the hip and the upper left leg. Because of the rapidly deteriorating condition, the patient was referred to our burn ICU with the picture of a progressive necrotizing fasciitis. The skin necrosis required immediate epifascial necrectomy. Additionally local therapy with topical antiseptics was performed. The surface was temporarily covered with xenograft, definitive coverage was achieved with autologuous skin graft transplantation. Advancements in wound care and critical care, which have become standard in the treatment protocols of patients with necrotizing soft-tissue infections, have markedly improved the prognosis. However, these infections continue to be a source of high morbidity and mortality and significant healthcare resource consumption. These challenging patients are best served with prompt diagnosis, immediate radical surgical debridement, and aggressive critical care management. Referral to a burn center may help to provide best possible surgical intervention, wound care, and critical care management.

Journal

European Journal of Plastic SurgerySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 1, 2007

References

  • Burn center management of necrotizing soft-tissue surgical infections in unburned patients
    Faucher, LD; Morris, SE; Edelman, LS; Saffle, JR

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