Natal dispersal in relation to population density and sex ratio in the field vole, Microtus agrestis

Natal dispersal in relation to population density and sex ratio in the field vole, Microtus agrestis In a sample of 240 juvenile field voles 8% of the males and 22% of the females reached sexual maturity within their natal home range. Among individuals retrapped as adults, 58% of males and 23% of females had dispersed, i.e. had moved more than one home range diameter. The mean distance moved for males (58.5 m) exceeded that for females (28.6 m). Male movement distances were negatively associated with total density, and with density of adult females, but not with male density. Female movements were not related to population density. There were no relation between sex ratio and distance moved. The distribution of distances moved for both males and females fit a geometrical distribution, suggesting the importance of competitive processes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Oecologia Springer Journals

Natal dispersal in relation to population density and sex ratio in the field vole, Microtus agrestis

Oecologia, Volume 83 (2) – Jun 1, 1990

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1990 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Life Sciences; Ecology; Plant Sciences
ISSN
0029-8549
eISSN
1432-1939
DOI
10.1007/BF00317745
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In a sample of 240 juvenile field voles 8% of the males and 22% of the females reached sexual maturity within their natal home range. Among individuals retrapped as adults, 58% of males and 23% of females had dispersed, i.e. had moved more than one home range diameter. The mean distance moved for males (58.5 m) exceeded that for females (28.6 m). Male movement distances were negatively associated with total density, and with density of adult females, but not with male density. Female movements were not related to population density. There were no relation between sex ratio and distance moved. The distribution of distances moved for both males and females fit a geometrical distribution, suggesting the importance of competitive processes.

Journal

OecologiaSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 1, 1990

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