Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Narrating the Beginnings: Of Gods and Men: Bridging the Gap between Cosmogony and the Heroic Age in Early Greek Legendary History

Narrating the Beginnings: Of Gods and Men: Bridging the Gap between Cosmogony and the Heroic Age... [In my 2016 book From Hittite to Homer: The Anatolian Background of Ancient Greek Epic, I argued that one can detect two separate lines of transmission for Near Eastern theogonic and heroic epic, the former, with more evident west Semitic influence, coming to Euboea via Cyprus, which archaeological evidence shows was the source of goods offering prestige in part by their connection to the faraway east (ca. 1000 BC); and the latter occurring in the multicultural, multilingual context of western Anatolia, which shaped the Homeric epic tradition on the fall of Troy (beginning as early as ca. 1160 BC), a city that had been a place of contestation and contact between Greek-speakers and barbarians since the Bronze Age. However, although Homer’s Iliad and Hesiod’s Theogony have different prehistories, it does not mean it is unproductive to look for theogonic motifs in the Iliad.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Narrating the Beginnings: Of Gods and Men: Bridging the Gap between Cosmogony and the Heroic Age in Early Greek Legendary History

Springer Journals — Apr 2, 2021

Loading next page...
/lp/springer-journals/narrating-the-beginnings-of-gods-and-men-bridging-the-gap-between-XU0zP0eZE4
Datasource
Springer Journals
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

[In my 2016 book From Hittite to Homer: The Anatolian Background of Ancient Greek Epic, I argued that one can detect two separate lines of transmission for Near Eastern theogonic and heroic epic, the former, with more evident west Semitic influence, coming to Euboea via Cyprus, which archaeological evidence shows was the source of goods offering prestige in part by their connection to the faraway east (ca. 1000 BC); and the latter occurring in the multicultural, multilingual context of western Anatolia, which shaped the Homeric epic tradition on the fall of Troy (beginning as early as ca. 1160 BC), a city that had been a place of contestation and contact between Greek-speakers and barbarians since the Bronze Age. However, although Homer’s Iliad and Hesiod’s Theogony have different prehistories, it does not mean it is unproductive to look for theogonic motifs in the Iliad.]

There are no references for this article.