Naloxone blocks the antianxiety but not the motor effects of benzodiazepines and pentobarbital: experimental studies and literature review

Naloxone blocks the antianxiety but not the motor effects of benzodiazepines and pentobarbital:... 213 120 120 2 2 A. Ågmo A. Galvan A. Heredia M. Morales Laboratoire de Psychophysiologie Université de Tours, Faculté des Sciences Parc de Grandmont F-37200 Tours France Department of Psychology Universidad Anahuac Mexico City Mexico Abstract The role of opioid systems in the anticonflict effect of chlordiazepoxide, diazepam and pentobarbital was evaluated with a modified Vogel procedure. First, morphine, ineffective by itself, was combined with subeffective or marginally effective doses of the benzodiazepines in order to detect possible potentiation. However, the combined treatment reduced licking in the Vogel procedure as well as in a licking test where no shock was administered. Several doses of the benzodiazepines and pentobarbital were then administered in combination with several doses of the opiate antagonist naloxone. A dose-dependent inhibition of anticonflict effect was obtained. In an additional experiment, it was shown that naloxone blocked the effects of diazepam in the elevated plus-maze procedure. Motor deficiencies, as evaluated with a rotarod test, produced by the benzodiazepines and pentobarbital could not be antagonized by naloxone. It is concluded that opioids are important for the anticonflict but not for the motor effects of these drugs. An analysis of published studies concerning the interaction of opioids and benzodiazepines in several procedures supposed to reflect anxiolytic effects shows that the inhibition obtained with naloxone is reliable and not procedure specific. The mechanisms by which opiate antagonists produce this inhibition of anticonflict activity are not known. It is tentatively suggested that opioid activation associated with stress may be a necessary component of anxiolysis. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychopharmacology Springer Journals

Naloxone blocks the antianxiety but not the motor effects of benzodiazepines and pentobarbital: experimental studies and literature review

Psychopharmacology, Volume 120 (2) – Jul 1, 1995

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Biomedicine; Pharmacology/Toxicology; Psychiatry
ISSN
0033-3158
eISSN
1432-2072
DOI
10.1007/BF02246192
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

213 120 120 2 2 A. Ågmo A. Galvan A. Heredia M. Morales Laboratoire de Psychophysiologie Université de Tours, Faculté des Sciences Parc de Grandmont F-37200 Tours France Department of Psychology Universidad Anahuac Mexico City Mexico Abstract The role of opioid systems in the anticonflict effect of chlordiazepoxide, diazepam and pentobarbital was evaluated with a modified Vogel procedure. First, morphine, ineffective by itself, was combined with subeffective or marginally effective doses of the benzodiazepines in order to detect possible potentiation. However, the combined treatment reduced licking in the Vogel procedure as well as in a licking test where no shock was administered. Several doses of the benzodiazepines and pentobarbital were then administered in combination with several doses of the opiate antagonist naloxone. A dose-dependent inhibition of anticonflict effect was obtained. In an additional experiment, it was shown that naloxone blocked the effects of diazepam in the elevated plus-maze procedure. Motor deficiencies, as evaluated with a rotarod test, produced by the benzodiazepines and pentobarbital could not be antagonized by naloxone. It is concluded that opioids are important for the anticonflict but not for the motor effects of these drugs. An analysis of published studies concerning the interaction of opioids and benzodiazepines in several procedures supposed to reflect anxiolytic effects shows that the inhibition obtained with naloxone is reliable and not procedure specific. The mechanisms by which opiate antagonists produce this inhibition of anticonflict activity are not known. It is tentatively suggested that opioid activation associated with stress may be a necessary component of anxiolysis.

Journal

PsychopharmacologySpringer Journals

Published: Jul 1, 1995

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