Molecular mechanisms of glutamate receptor-mediated excitotoxic neuronal cell death

Molecular mechanisms of glutamate receptor-mediated excitotoxic neuronal cell death Excitotoxicity is one of the most extensively studied processes of neuronal cell death, and plays an important role in many central nervous system (CNS) diseases, including CNS ischemia, trauma, and neurodegenerative disorders. First described by Olney, excitotoxicity was later characterized as an excessive synaptic release of glutamate, which in turn activates postsynaptic glutamate receptors. While almost every glutamate receptor subtype has been implicated in mediating excitotoxic cell death, it is generally accepted that the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtypes play a major role, mainly owing to their high calcium (Ca2+) permeability. However, other glutamate receptor subtypes such as 2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazol-4-yl) propionate (AMPA) or kainate receptors have also been attributed a critical role in mediating excitotoxic neuronal cell death. Although the molecular basis of glutamate toxicity is uncertain, there is general agreement that it is in large part Ca2+-dependent. The present review is aimed at summarizing the molecular mechanisms of NMDA receptor and AMPA/kainate receptor-mediated excitotoxic neuronal cell death. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Molecular Neurobiology Springer Journals

Molecular mechanisms of glutamate receptor-mediated excitotoxic neuronal cell death

Molecular Neurobiology, Volume 24 (3) – May 31, 2007

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/molecular-mechanisms-of-glutamate-receptor-mediated-excitotoxic-hN0yqLzzQu
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 by Humana Press Inc
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Neurology; Cell Biology
ISSN
0893-7648
eISSN
1559-1182
D.O.I.
10.1385/MN:24:1-3:107
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Excitotoxicity is one of the most extensively studied processes of neuronal cell death, and plays an important role in many central nervous system (CNS) diseases, including CNS ischemia, trauma, and neurodegenerative disorders. First described by Olney, excitotoxicity was later characterized as an excessive synaptic release of glutamate, which in turn activates postsynaptic glutamate receptors. While almost every glutamate receptor subtype has been implicated in mediating excitotoxic cell death, it is generally accepted that the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtypes play a major role, mainly owing to their high calcium (Ca2+) permeability. However, other glutamate receptor subtypes such as 2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazol-4-yl) propionate (AMPA) or kainate receptors have also been attributed a critical role in mediating excitotoxic neuronal cell death. Although the molecular basis of glutamate toxicity is uncertain, there is general agreement that it is in large part Ca2+-dependent. The present review is aimed at summarizing the molecular mechanisms of NMDA receptor and AMPA/kainate receptor-mediated excitotoxic neuronal cell death.

Journal

Molecular NeurobiologySpringer Journals

Published: May 31, 2007

References

  • Cloned glutamate receptors
    Hollmann, M.; Heinemann, S.
  • Glutamate neurotoxicity in cortical cell culture
    Choi, D. W.; Maulucci-Gedde, M.; Kriegstein, A. R.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off