Microspore culture in wheat (Triticum aestivum) – doubled haploid production via induced embryogenesis

Microspore culture in wheat (Triticum aestivum) – doubled haploid production via induced... The inherent potential to produce plants from microspores or immature pollen exists naturally in many plant species. Some genotypes in hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) also exhibit the trait for androgenesis. Under most circumstances, however, an artificial manipulation, in the form of physical, physiological and/or chemical treatment, need to be employed to switch microspores from gametophytic development to a sporophytic pathway. Induced embryogenic microspores, characterized by unique morphological features, undergo organized cell divisions and differentiation that lead to a direct formation of embryoids. Embryoids `germinate' to give rise to haploid or doubled haploid plants. The switch from terminal differentiation of pollen grain formation to sporophytic development of embryoid production involves a treatment that halts gametogenesis and initiates sporogenesis showing predictable cellular and molecular events. In principle, the inductive treatments may act to release microspores from cell cycle control that ensures mature pollen formation hence overcome a developmental block to embryogenesis. Isolated microspore culture, genetic analyses, and studies of cellular and molecular mechanisms related to microspore embryogenesis have yielded useful information for both understanding androgenesis and improving the efficiency of doubled haploid production. The precise mechanisms for microspore embryogenesis, however, must await more research. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plant Cell, Tissue and Organ Culture Springer Journals

Microspore culture in wheat (Triticum aestivum) – doubled haploid production via induced embryogenesis

Plant Cell, Tissue and Organ Culture, Volume 73 (3) – Oct 11, 2004

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Life Sciences; Plant Sciences; Plant Physiology
ISSN
0167-6857
eISSN
1573-5044
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1023076213639
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The inherent potential to produce plants from microspores or immature pollen exists naturally in many plant species. Some genotypes in hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) also exhibit the trait for androgenesis. Under most circumstances, however, an artificial manipulation, in the form of physical, physiological and/or chemical treatment, need to be employed to switch microspores from gametophytic development to a sporophytic pathway. Induced embryogenic microspores, characterized by unique morphological features, undergo organized cell divisions and differentiation that lead to a direct formation of embryoids. Embryoids `germinate' to give rise to haploid or doubled haploid plants. The switch from terminal differentiation of pollen grain formation to sporophytic development of embryoid production involves a treatment that halts gametogenesis and initiates sporogenesis showing predictable cellular and molecular events. In principle, the inductive treatments may act to release microspores from cell cycle control that ensures mature pollen formation hence overcome a developmental block to embryogenesis. Isolated microspore culture, genetic analyses, and studies of cellular and molecular mechanisms related to microspore embryogenesis have yielded useful information for both understanding androgenesis and improving the efficiency of doubled haploid production. The precise mechanisms for microspore embryogenesis, however, must await more research.

Journal

Plant Cell, Tissue and Organ CultureSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 11, 2004

References

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