Metformin improves ovulation and pregnancy rates in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome

Metformin improves ovulation and pregnancy rates in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome We evaluated the fertility promoting effect of metformin in infertile patients with polycystic ovary syndrome. Twenty-nine infertile patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are included in our prospectively designed study and 15 normal menstruating women served as controls for reproductive hormones and ovarian volumes. All PCOS patients received a total of 78 cycles of clomiphene citrate (CC) in the beginning, then patients who could not get pregnant were switched to metformin plus clomiphene citrate. PCOS patients served as their own controls for the ovulation and pregnancy rates. At the end of the CC cycles 4.2% of patients got pregnant and 65.2% of the remaining group got pregnant with metformin plus CC cycles (p=0.0001). We have not observed any serious side effects of metformin. The high pregnancy rate of our study population is consistent with the hypothesis that insulin resistance plays an important role in the pathogenesis of anovulation in patients with PCOS. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics Springer Journals

Metformin improves ovulation and pregnancy rates in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 by Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Gynecology; Obstetrics/Perinatology; Endocrinology; Human Genetics
ISSN
0932-0067
eISSN
1432-0711
DOI
10.1007/s004040100176
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We evaluated the fertility promoting effect of metformin in infertile patients with polycystic ovary syndrome. Twenty-nine infertile patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are included in our prospectively designed study and 15 normal menstruating women served as controls for reproductive hormones and ovarian volumes. All PCOS patients received a total of 78 cycles of clomiphene citrate (CC) in the beginning, then patients who could not get pregnant were switched to metformin plus clomiphene citrate. PCOS patients served as their own controls for the ovulation and pregnancy rates. At the end of the CC cycles 4.2% of patients got pregnant and 65.2% of the remaining group got pregnant with metformin plus CC cycles (p=0.0001). We have not observed any serious side effects of metformin. The high pregnancy rate of our study population is consistent with the hypothesis that insulin resistance plays an important role in the pathogenesis of anovulation in patients with PCOS.

Journal

Archives of Gynecology and ObstetricsSpringer Journals

Published: Aug 1, 2001

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