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Mechanical Testing for the Biomechanics EngineerAppendices Practical Orthopaedic Biomechanics Problems

Mechanical Testing for the Biomechanics Engineer: Appendices Practical Orthopaedic Biomechanics... [In this chapter, we work to put into practice what has been applied in the previous chapters of this book. The goal of publishing a research study is to provide the interested/invested reader with information gained upon completion of an experimental study. The key is that information must be relevant and novel to the field. It must add a piece of information that was not previously known (novel) but should be known (relevant). In biomechanics, this can range from designing a new implant or evaluating a new fixation technique to repeating a study in a more appropriate animal model than what has been conducted to date in the field. There are all sorts of valid motivations for conducting a research study. The focus of the paper is on the question asked and the relevance of that question. Publications do not often focus on the details of the study but assume that the researchers know how to do their jobs and that the study findings are reliable. As such, much of the details we have tried to focus on in the book to obtain reliable data through proper use of engineering principles and design are omitted and not even discussed in the literature. But they should always be followed to the best of the researchers’ abilities, as the research group is accountable for their research findings and their interpretation of those findings. Whether or not the reader takes the same interpretation is not of concern. For example, some surgeons reading a paper based upon a comparison of fracture fixation techniques may be persuaded to change their surgical treatment based upon the study, while others may not.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Mechanical Testing for the Biomechanics EngineerAppendices Practical Orthopaedic Biomechanics Problems

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Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2015
ISBN
978-3-031-00534-3
Pages
203 –241
DOI
10.1007/978-3-031-01662-2_8
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[In this chapter, we work to put into practice what has been applied in the previous chapters of this book. The goal of publishing a research study is to provide the interested/invested reader with information gained upon completion of an experimental study. The key is that information must be relevant and novel to the field. It must add a piece of information that was not previously known (novel) but should be known (relevant). In biomechanics, this can range from designing a new implant or evaluating a new fixation technique to repeating a study in a more appropriate animal model than what has been conducted to date in the field. There are all sorts of valid motivations for conducting a research study. The focus of the paper is on the question asked and the relevance of that question. Publications do not often focus on the details of the study but assume that the researchers know how to do their jobs and that the study findings are reliable. As such, much of the details we have tried to focus on in the book to obtain reliable data through proper use of engineering principles and design are omitted and not even discussed in the literature. But they should always be followed to the best of the researchers’ abilities, as the research group is accountable for their research findings and their interpretation of those findings. Whether or not the reader takes the same interpretation is not of concern. For example, some surgeons reading a paper based upon a comparison of fracture fixation techniques may be persuaded to change their surgical treatment based upon the study, while others may not.]

Published: Jan 1, 2015

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