Mecamylamine pretreatment increases subsequent nicotine self-administration as indicated by changes in plasma nicotine level

Mecamylamine pretreatment increases subsequent nicotine self-administration as indicated by... 213 91 91 3 3 C. S. Pomerleau O. F. Pomerleau M. J. Majchrzak Behavioral Medicine Program, Department of Psychiatry University of Michigan 48105 Ann Arbor MI USA Abstract Acute administration of mecamylamine, a centrally active nicotinic cholinergic agonist, has been shown to increase amount of smoking as indicated by smoking topography (e.g., puff rate, puff duration), expired carbon monoxide changes, and other inferential measures. In the present study, subjects showed significantly greater increases in plasma nicotine following smoking of two high-nicotine research cigarettes when pretreated with mecamylamine than when pretreated with placebo, even though no significant differences in puff volume or puff number were detected. Interestingly, none of our subjects reported nausea, although some achieved plasma nicotine levels at which nausea would typically be expected. We attribute the observed increases in nicotine intake to compensatory behavior designed to overcome mecamylamine's blocking effects. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychopharmacology Springer Journals

Mecamylamine pretreatment increases subsequent nicotine self-administration as indicated by changes in plasma nicotine level

Psychopharmacology, Volume 91 (3) – Sep 1, 1987

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1987 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Biomedicine; Pharmacology/Toxicology; Psychiatry
ISSN
0033-3158
eISSN
1432-2072
D.O.I.
10.1007/BF00518198
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

213 91 91 3 3 C. S. Pomerleau O. F. Pomerleau M. J. Majchrzak Behavioral Medicine Program, Department of Psychiatry University of Michigan 48105 Ann Arbor MI USA Abstract Acute administration of mecamylamine, a centrally active nicotinic cholinergic agonist, has been shown to increase amount of smoking as indicated by smoking topography (e.g., puff rate, puff duration), expired carbon monoxide changes, and other inferential measures. In the present study, subjects showed significantly greater increases in plasma nicotine following smoking of two high-nicotine research cigarettes when pretreated with mecamylamine than when pretreated with placebo, even though no significant differences in puff volume or puff number were detected. Interestingly, none of our subjects reported nausea, although some achieved plasma nicotine levels at which nausea would typically be expected. We attribute the observed increases in nicotine intake to compensatory behavior designed to overcome mecamylamine's blocking effects.

Journal

PsychopharmacologySpringer Journals

Published: Sep 1, 1987

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