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Marketing as Control of Human Interfaces and Its Political Exploitation

Marketing as Control of Human Interfaces and Its Political Exploitation Philosophy & Technology (2019) 32:379–388 https://doi.org/10.1007/s13347-019-00374-7 EDITOR LETTER Marketing as Control of Human Interfaces and Its Political Exploitation 1,2 Luciano Floridi Published online: 10 August 2019 Springer Nature B.V. 2019 1 Introduction: Understanding Ourselves There is an endless number of ways to describe anything, including ourselves. In a more formal context, this is made clear and precise by speaking of levels of abstraction (Floridi 2008). Social scientists prefer to speak of “lenses”, but the idea is the same. The point is not whether a description is accurate in absolute terms (is John a featherless biped? Or the details on his passport? Or 60% water and 40% something else? Or…) but whether it fulfils its purpose, and how well it does so, when compared with other descriptions. When we think that a description is the only one available, this is usually because we take its purpose for granted. Thus, we may describe an artefact as a “vehicle” because we take for granted a specific function or purpose of that artefact, but that description could easily change, if, for example, it is the SS-100-X presidential limousine in which Kennedy was a passenger when he was assassinated. All of a sudden “vehicle” http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy & Technology Springer Journals

Marketing as Control of Human Interfaces and Its Political Exploitation

Philosophy & Technology , Volume 32 (3) – Aug 10, 2019

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 by Springer Nature B.V.
Subject
Philosophy; Philosophy of Technology
ISSN
2210-5433
eISSN
2210-5441
DOI
10.1007/s13347-019-00374-7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Philosophy & Technology (2019) 32:379–388 https://doi.org/10.1007/s13347-019-00374-7 EDITOR LETTER Marketing as Control of Human Interfaces and Its Political Exploitation 1,2 Luciano Floridi Published online: 10 August 2019 Springer Nature B.V. 2019 1 Introduction: Understanding Ourselves There is an endless number of ways to describe anything, including ourselves. In a more formal context, this is made clear and precise by speaking of levels of abstraction (Floridi 2008). Social scientists prefer to speak of “lenses”, but the idea is the same. The point is not whether a description is accurate in absolute terms (is John a featherless biped? Or the details on his passport? Or 60% water and 40% something else? Or…) but whether it fulfils its purpose, and how well it does so, when compared with other descriptions. When we think that a description is the only one available, this is usually because we take its purpose for granted. Thus, we may describe an artefact as a “vehicle” because we take for granted a specific function or purpose of that artefact, but that description could easily change, if, for example, it is the SS-100-X presidential limousine in which Kennedy was a passenger when he was assassinated. All of a sudden “vehicle”

Journal

Philosophy & TechnologySpringer Journals

Published: Aug 10, 2019

References