Malate dismutation by Desulfovibrio

Malate dismutation by Desulfovibrio 203 71 71 3 3 J. D. A. Miller P. M. Neumann Lynette Elford D. S. Wakerley Department of Chemical Engineering University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology England National Physical Laboratory Teddington England Department of Botany King's College London England Warren Spring Laboratory Stevenage England Summary 1. Nine strains of Desulfovibrio , representing 4 species, grew by dismutation of malate in “sulphate-free” medium; succinate, fumarate and acetate were end-products of growth. 2. Two strains of D. vulgaris could only grow in malate medium in presence of sulphate as terminal electron acceptor. 3. Two dismuting strains of D. desulfuricans and two non-dismuting strains of D. vulgaris , all grown in a lactate medium, showed fumarase activity of the same order of magnitude. 4. The two dismuting strains showed high succinate dehydrogenase activity when grown in lactate medium; one of the non-dismuting strains ( Woolwich ) exhibited very low activity, while in the other non-dismuter ( Hildenborough ) the presence of succinate dehydrogenase was not conclusively proved. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Microbiology Springer Journals

Malate dismutation by Desulfovibrio

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1970 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Life Sciences; Biotechnology; Biochemistry, general; Cell Biology; Ecology; Microbial Ecology; Microbiology
ISSN
0302-8933
eISSN
1432-072X
DOI
10.1007/BF00410154
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

203 71 71 3 3 J. D. A. Miller P. M. Neumann Lynette Elford D. S. Wakerley Department of Chemical Engineering University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology England National Physical Laboratory Teddington England Department of Botany King's College London England Warren Spring Laboratory Stevenage England Summary 1. Nine strains of Desulfovibrio , representing 4 species, grew by dismutation of malate in “sulphate-free” medium; succinate, fumarate and acetate were end-products of growth. 2. Two strains of D. vulgaris could only grow in malate medium in presence of sulphate as terminal electron acceptor. 3. Two dismuting strains of D. desulfuricans and two non-dismuting strains of D. vulgaris , all grown in a lactate medium, showed fumarase activity of the same order of magnitude. 4. The two dismuting strains showed high succinate dehydrogenase activity when grown in lactate medium; one of the non-dismuting strains ( Woolwich ) exhibited very low activity, while in the other non-dismuter ( Hildenborough ) the presence of succinate dehydrogenase was not conclusively proved.

Journal

Archives of MicrobiologySpringer Journals

Published: Sep 1, 1970

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