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Language, Identity and Liberation in Contemporary Irish LiteratureWriting Republicanism: A Betrayal of Entrenched Tribalism in Belfast’s Own Vernacular

Language, Identity and Liberation in Contemporary Irish Literature: Writing Republicanism: A... [Since the complete disbandment of the Provisional IRA in September of 2006, withdrawal of all British military presence in the region in accordance with the Good Friday Peace Agreement and the erection of a power-sharing government in Northern Ireland in May of 2007, the region’s populations now share the challenge of reconciliation after decades of bloodshed and isolation. The journey to this pivotal crossroads has certainly been marked with serious challenges of failed ceasefires, multiple breakdowns in cross-communal talks and very slow economic growth in the late decades of the twentieth century but the region’s political structure is slowly developing into a legitimate democracy. Today’s Northern Ireland continues to distance itself from its historical precedent of a state built on Protestant privilege in the early decades of the twentieth century. If, as Bourke claims, it is a basic precept of modern democracy that “politics should cater to the common good…that a democratic state is supposed to serve not a majority but the totality of its population,” how then can power-sharing in Northern Ireland fare in a society so heavily steeped in colonial traditions of privilege for the few at the expense of the masses and zealot nationalism to counter such traditions?] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Language, Identity and Liberation in Contemporary Irish LiteratureWriting Republicanism: A Betrayal of Entrenched Tribalism in Belfast’s Own Vernacular

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Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan UK
Copyright
© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 2009
ISBN
978-1-349-31489-8
Pages
58 –99
DOI
10.1057/9780230275089_3
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[Since the complete disbandment of the Provisional IRA in September of 2006, withdrawal of all British military presence in the region in accordance with the Good Friday Peace Agreement and the erection of a power-sharing government in Northern Ireland in May of 2007, the region’s populations now share the challenge of reconciliation after decades of bloodshed and isolation. The journey to this pivotal crossroads has certainly been marked with serious challenges of failed ceasefires, multiple breakdowns in cross-communal talks and very slow economic growth in the late decades of the twentieth century but the region’s political structure is slowly developing into a legitimate democracy. Today’s Northern Ireland continues to distance itself from its historical precedent of a state built on Protestant privilege in the early decades of the twentieth century. If, as Bourke claims, it is a basic precept of modern democracy that “politics should cater to the common good…that a democratic state is supposed to serve not a majority but the totality of its population,” how then can power-sharing in Northern Ireland fare in a society so heavily steeped in colonial traditions of privilege for the few at the expense of the masses and zealot nationalism to counter such traditions?]

Published: Oct 9, 2015

Keywords: Language System; Speech Pattern; Irish Language; Catholic Community; Public Narrative

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