Label-free voltammetric detection of single-nucleotide mismatches recognized by the protein MutS

Label-free voltammetric detection of single-nucleotide mismatches recognized by the protein MutS MutS, a protein involved in DNA mismatch repair, recognizes mispaired and unpaired bases in duplex DNA. We have previously used MutS in an electrochemical double-surface technique (DST) for in-vitro detection of point mutations in DNA. The DST involved binding of unlabeled MutS to DNA heteroduplexes at the surface of magnetic beads followed by a highly sensitive electrochemical determination of the protein by measurement of a catalytic protein signal (peak H) at mercury electrodes. Detection of MutS using a peak resulting from oxidation of tyrosine and tryptophan residues of the protein at a carbon-paste electrode (CPE) was also possible but was approximately three orders of magnitude less sensitive. In this work we present an optimized technique for ex-situ voltammetric determination of MutS at a CPE. Choice of optimum experimental conditions (pH of supporting electrolyte, square-wave voltammetry settings, etc.) resulted in substantial improvement of the sensitivity of the assay, enabling detection of approximately 140 pg (1.6 fmol protein monomer) MutS in a 5-μL sample. The sensitivity was increased further by acid hydrolysis of the protein before measurement. The hydrolyzed protein was detectable down to 5 pg (approx. 56 amol) MutS in 5 μL solution. By using the DST combined with determination of the bound unlabeled MutS at the CPE we demonstrated selective interactions of the protein with single-base mismatches and discrimination among different base mispairs in 30-mer or 95-mer DNA duplexes. In agreement with previous studies, binding of the protein to the 30-mer substrates followed the trend G:T>>C:A>A:A>C:T>homoduplex. The electrochemical data were confirmed by use of an independent technique—a quartz-crystal microbalance for real-time monitoring of MutS interactions with DNA duplexes containing different base mispairs. By using the electrochemical DST a G:T mismatch was detectable in up to 1000-fold excess of homoduplex DNA. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry Springer Journals

Label-free voltammetric detection of single-nucleotide mismatches recognized by the protein MutS

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/label-free-voltammetric-detection-of-single-nucleotide-mismatches-rb3QkzcrOF
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Chemistry; Analytical Chemistry; Biochemistry, general; Laboratory Medicine; Characterization and Evaluation of Materials; Food Science; Monitoring/Environmental Analysis
ISSN
1618-2642
eISSN
1618-2650
DOI
10.1007/s00216-007-1181-7
pmid
17333147
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

MutS, a protein involved in DNA mismatch repair, recognizes mispaired and unpaired bases in duplex DNA. We have previously used MutS in an electrochemical double-surface technique (DST) for in-vitro detection of point mutations in DNA. The DST involved binding of unlabeled MutS to DNA heteroduplexes at the surface of magnetic beads followed by a highly sensitive electrochemical determination of the protein by measurement of a catalytic protein signal (peak H) at mercury electrodes. Detection of MutS using a peak resulting from oxidation of tyrosine and tryptophan residues of the protein at a carbon-paste electrode (CPE) was also possible but was approximately three orders of magnitude less sensitive. In this work we present an optimized technique for ex-situ voltammetric determination of MutS at a CPE. Choice of optimum experimental conditions (pH of supporting electrolyte, square-wave voltammetry settings, etc.) resulted in substantial improvement of the sensitivity of the assay, enabling detection of approximately 140 pg (1.6 fmol protein monomer) MutS in a 5-μL sample. The sensitivity was increased further by acid hydrolysis of the protein before measurement. The hydrolyzed protein was detectable down to 5 pg (approx. 56 amol) MutS in 5 μL solution. By using the DST combined with determination of the bound unlabeled MutS at the CPE we demonstrated selective interactions of the protein with single-base mismatches and discrimination among different base mispairs in 30-mer or 95-mer DNA duplexes. In agreement with previous studies, binding of the protein to the 30-mer substrates followed the trend G:T>>C:A>A:A>C:T>homoduplex. The electrochemical data were confirmed by use of an independent technique—a quartz-crystal microbalance for real-time monitoring of MutS interactions with DNA duplexes containing different base mispairs. By using the electrochemical DST a G:T mismatch was detectable in up to 1000-fold excess of homoduplex DNA.

Journal

Analytical and Bioanalytical ChemistrySpringer Journals

Published: Feb 28, 2007

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off