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Jefferson’s Revolutionary Theory and the Reconstruction of Educational PurposeTwentieth-Century Jeffersonian Intervention: John Dewey and the Predicaments of American Democracy

Jefferson’s Revolutionary Theory and the Reconstruction of Educational Purpose: Twentieth-Century... [The chapter examines John Dewey’s understanding of the centrality of Jefferson’s thought to the American political and educational tradition. It describes how Dewey’s later writings reveal a great deal about his attitude toward Jefferson, which was overwhelmingly positive. A broad outline of their shared interests and moral ideals demonstrates how Dewey provided a twentieth century update to Jefferson’s legacy during the crisis of the 1930s. Finally, the case is made that both the Jeffersonian and Deweyan interpretation of human identity as something essentially social and moral provides a sound philosophical justification for reconstructing the purposes of public schools on a civic basis.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Jefferson’s Revolutionary Theory and the Reconstruction of Educational PurposeTwentieth-Century Jeffersonian Intervention: John Dewey and the Predicaments of American Democracy

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Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
© The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG, part of Springer Nature 2020
ISBN
978-3-030-45762-4
Pages
57 –70
DOI
10.1007/978-3-030-45763-1_4
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[The chapter examines John Dewey’s understanding of the centrality of Jefferson’s thought to the American political and educational tradition. It describes how Dewey’s later writings reveal a great deal about his attitude toward Jefferson, which was overwhelmingly positive. A broad outline of their shared interests and moral ideals demonstrates how Dewey provided a twentieth century update to Jefferson’s legacy during the crisis of the 1930s. Finally, the case is made that both the Jeffersonian and Deweyan interpretation of human identity as something essentially social and moral provides a sound philosophical justification for reconstructing the purposes of public schools on a civic basis.]

Published: May 28, 2020

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