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Jacob Schiff and the Art of RiskJapan

Jacob Schiff and the Art of Risk: Japan [In the half-century prior to the onset of the Russo-Japanese War and since Commodore Matthew C. Perry had first opened Japan’s doors to the West and its imperialism in 1853, Japan had already emerged from being ‘a weak, feudal, and agrarian country into a modern industrial power, economically and militarily capable of resisting foreign domination’. (Mark R. Peattie, The Japanese Colonial Empire, 1895–1945 (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1984), pp. 6–7.) Its prior isolation from sustained contact with its neighbours (1603–1867) and from the rest of the world had left Japan with a ‘cultural and linguistic distinctiveness [that had] made the Japanese highly self-conscious and acutely aware of their differences from others’. (Reischauer, Japan, p. 8.)] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

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Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
© The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s) 2018
ISBN
978-3-319-90265-4
Pages
109 –142
DOI
10.1007/978-3-319-90266-1_4
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[In the half-century prior to the onset of the Russo-Japanese War and since Commodore Matthew C. Perry had first opened Japan’s doors to the West and its imperialism in 1853, Japan had already emerged from being ‘a weak, feudal, and agrarian country into a modern industrial power, economically and militarily capable of resisting foreign domination’. (Mark R. Peattie, The Japanese Colonial Empire, 1895–1945 (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1984), pp. 6–7.) Its prior isolation from sustained contact with its neighbours (1603–1867) and from the rest of the world had left Japan with a ‘cultural and linguistic distinctiveness [that had] made the Japanese highly self-conscious and acutely aware of their differences from others’. (Reischauer, Japan, p. 8.)]

Published: Jun 20, 2018

Keywords: Japanese Colonial Empire; Left Japan; Reischauer; Armament Loans; Meiji Imperial

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