Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Is interviewing compatible with the dual-process model of culture?

Is interviewing compatible with the dual-process model of culture? Response Is interviewing compatible with the dual-process model of culture? Stephen Vaisey Department of Sociology, Duke University, Box 90088, Durham, NC 27708-0088, USA. E-mail: vaisey@soc.duke.edu This article relates to AJCS 2013.15. American Journal of Cultural Sociology (2014) 2, 150–158. doi:10.1057/ajcs.2013.8; published online 3 December 2013 What role should interviews play in the study of culture? The in-depth, semi-structured interview has been the workhorse of cultural sociology since the ‘cultural turn’ of the 1980s (see, for example, Lamont, 1992, 2000; Swidler, 2001). In the past few years, however, some cultural sociologists have drawn on cognitive science to criticize this approach, arguing that interviews cannot access the non-discursive cognitive processes that are most consequential for guiding action. One of these critics has gone so far as to claim that ‘if we want to learn about culture, the last thing we should do is to conduct in-depth interviews’ (Martin, 2010, p. 240). However, whether in extreme or mild forms, critiques of interview methods have become more and more common in cultural sociology. Pugh’s (2013) recent article pushes back against this trend and seeks to defend the interview as the primary tool of the cultural analyst. She outlines what she sees as the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Cultural Sociology Springer Journals

Is interviewing compatible with the dual-process model of culture?

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/is-interviewing-compatible-with-the-dual-process-model-of-culture-Knr3qdzqOr
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 by Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Ltd
Subject
Social Sciences; Social Sciences, general; Sociology, general; Sociology of Culture; Media Sociology
ISSN
2049-7113
eISSN
2049-7121
DOI
10.1057/ajcs.2013.8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Response Is interviewing compatible with the dual-process model of culture? Stephen Vaisey Department of Sociology, Duke University, Box 90088, Durham, NC 27708-0088, USA. E-mail: vaisey@soc.duke.edu This article relates to AJCS 2013.15. American Journal of Cultural Sociology (2014) 2, 150–158. doi:10.1057/ajcs.2013.8; published online 3 December 2013 What role should interviews play in the study of culture? The in-depth, semi-structured interview has been the workhorse of cultural sociology since the ‘cultural turn’ of the 1980s (see, for example, Lamont, 1992, 2000; Swidler, 2001). In the past few years, however, some cultural sociologists have drawn on cognitive science to criticize this approach, arguing that interviews cannot access the non-discursive cognitive processes that are most consequential for guiding action. One of these critics has gone so far as to claim that ‘if we want to learn about culture, the last thing we should do is to conduct in-depth interviews’ (Martin, 2010, p. 240). However, whether in extreme or mild forms, critiques of interview methods have become more and more common in cultural sociology. Pugh’s (2013) recent article pushes back against this trend and seeks to defend the interview as the primary tool of the cultural analyst. She outlines what she sees as the

Journal

American Journal of Cultural SociologySpringer Journals

Published: Dec 3, 2013

There are no references for this article.