Irrigation scheduling of plastic greenhouse vegetable crops based on historical weather data

Irrigation scheduling of plastic greenhouse vegetable crops based on historical weather data Irrigation scheduling based on the daily historical crop evapotranspiration (ETh) data was theoretically and experimentally assessed for the major soil-grown greenhouse horticultural crops on the Almería coast in order to improve irrigation efficiency. Overall, the simulated seasonal ETh values for different crop cycles from 41 greenhouses were not significantly different from the corresponding values of real-time crop evapotranspiration (ETc). Additionally, for the main greenhouse crops on the Almería coast, the simulated values of the maximum cumulative soil water deficit in each of the 15 consecutive growth cycles (1988–2002) were determined using simple soil-water balances comparing daily ETh and ETc values to schedule irrigation. In most cases, no soil-water deficits affecting greenhouse crop productivity were detected, but the few cases found led us to also assess experimentally the use of ETh for irrigation scheduling of greenhouse horticultural crops. The response of five greenhouse crops to water applications scheduled with daily estimates of ETh and ETc was evaluated in a typical enarenado soil. In tomato, fruit yield did not differ statistically between irrigation treatments, but the spring green bean irrigated using the ETh data presented lower yield than that irrigated using the ETc data. In the remaining experiments, the irrigation-management method based on ETh data was modified to consider the standard deviation of the inter-annual greenhouse reference ET. No differences between irrigation treatments were found for productivity of pepper, zucchini and melon crops. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Irrigation Science Springer Journals

Irrigation scheduling of plastic greenhouse vegetable crops based on historical weather data

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/irrigation-scheduling-of-plastic-greenhouse-vegetable-crops-based-on-Ai8cK9DGhC
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Life Sciences; Waste Water Technology / Water Pollution Control / Water Management / Aquatic Pollution; Forestry; Soil Science & Conservation ; Plant Sciences ; Agriculture
ISSN
0342-7188
eISSN
1432-1319
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00271-006-0034-z
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Irrigation scheduling based on the daily historical crop evapotranspiration (ETh) data was theoretically and experimentally assessed for the major soil-grown greenhouse horticultural crops on the Almería coast in order to improve irrigation efficiency. Overall, the simulated seasonal ETh values for different crop cycles from 41 greenhouses were not significantly different from the corresponding values of real-time crop evapotranspiration (ETc). Additionally, for the main greenhouse crops on the Almería coast, the simulated values of the maximum cumulative soil water deficit in each of the 15 consecutive growth cycles (1988–2002) were determined using simple soil-water balances comparing daily ETh and ETc values to schedule irrigation. In most cases, no soil-water deficits affecting greenhouse crop productivity were detected, but the few cases found led us to also assess experimentally the use of ETh for irrigation scheduling of greenhouse horticultural crops. The response of five greenhouse crops to water applications scheduled with daily estimates of ETh and ETc was evaluated in a typical enarenado soil. In tomato, fruit yield did not differ statistically between irrigation treatments, but the spring green bean irrigated using the ETh data presented lower yield than that irrigated using the ETc data. In the remaining experiments, the irrigation-management method based on ETh data was modified to consider the standard deviation of the inter-annual greenhouse reference ET. No differences between irrigation treatments were found for productivity of pepper, zucchini and melon crops.

Journal

Irrigation ScienceSpringer Journals

Published: Apr 5, 2006

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off