Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

iPad-Based Patient Briefing for Radiological Examinations—a Clinical Trial

iPad-Based Patient Briefing for Radiological Examinations—a Clinical Trial To analyze if an iPad-based patient briefing can serve as a digital alternative to conventional documentations prior to radiological examinations. One hundred one patients referred for routine MRI were randomized into two groups, who underwent iPad-based and classic written briefing in opposite order. For each briefing completion time, completeness and correctness were noted. Patient’s knowledge about the content of either briefing modality was subsequently tested. The influence of patient-related factors on the performance of the electronic briefing (EB) was analyzed. Finally, the patient’s subjective impression of the EB was assessed. The mean durations were 4.4 ± 2.2 min for EB and 1.7 ± 1.3 min for the classic briefing (p < 0.01). All iPad briefings were returned entirely filled out, whereas 11 % of the classic forms were returned with missing data. No significant differences in memorization of the briefing’s information were objectified. There was a positive correlation between the duration of EB and age (r = 0.53; p < 0.01), whereas a negative correlation was found between computer skills and patient’s age (r = −0.55; p < 0.01) or duration of EB (r = −0.62; p < 0.01). More than half of the study patients would prefer EB in the future; another 29 % had no preference at all. Patient briefing on iPads transfers the information for the patients equally well compared to the classic written approach. Although iPad briefing took patients longer to perform, the majority would prefer it to written consent briefings in the future. Nevertheless, measures have to be undertaken to improve the overall acceptance and performance. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Digital Imaging Springer Journals

iPad-Based Patient Briefing for Radiological Examinations—a Clinical Trial

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/ipad-based-patient-briefing-for-radiological-examinations-a-clinical-pkT8amX9qP
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 by Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Imaging / Radiology
ISSN
0897-1889
eISSN
1618-727X
DOI
10.1007/s10278-014-9688-x
pmid
24687643
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

To analyze if an iPad-based patient briefing can serve as a digital alternative to conventional documentations prior to radiological examinations. One hundred one patients referred for routine MRI were randomized into two groups, who underwent iPad-based and classic written briefing in opposite order. For each briefing completion time, completeness and correctness were noted. Patient’s knowledge about the content of either briefing modality was subsequently tested. The influence of patient-related factors on the performance of the electronic briefing (EB) was analyzed. Finally, the patient’s subjective impression of the EB was assessed. The mean durations were 4.4 ± 2.2 min for EB and 1.7 ± 1.3 min for the classic briefing (p < 0.01). All iPad briefings were returned entirely filled out, whereas 11 % of the classic forms were returned with missing data. No significant differences in memorization of the briefing’s information were objectified. There was a positive correlation between the duration of EB and age (r = 0.53; p < 0.01), whereas a negative correlation was found between computer skills and patient’s age (r = −0.55; p < 0.01) or duration of EB (r = −0.62; p < 0.01). More than half of the study patients would prefer EB in the future; another 29 % had no preference at all. Patient briefing on iPads transfers the information for the patients equally well compared to the classic written approach. Although iPad briefing took patients longer to perform, the majority would prefer it to written consent briefings in the future. Nevertheless, measures have to be undertaken to improve the overall acceptance and performance.

Journal

Journal of Digital ImagingSpringer Journals

Published: Apr 1, 2014

References