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Introduction: Theoretical and Technological Perspectives on Online Arguments

Introduction: Theoretical and Technological Perspectives on Online Arguments Philos. Technol. (2017) 30:131–135 DOI 10.1007/s13347-017-0264-4 EDITORIAL NOTE Introduction: Theoretical and Technological Perspectives on Online Arguments 1 2 Fabio Paglieri & Chris Reed Received: 28 April 2017 /Accepted: 3 May 2017 /Published online: 8 May 2017 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2017 Argumentation has been a topic of interest for philosophy since its very inception—not surprisingly, given that philosophical inquiry is first and foremost about the articulation of cogent arguments. Aristotle’s Sophistical Refutations offered the first in a long list of taxonomies of fallacious arguments throughout the history of philosophy, either with a focus on rhetorical aspects (Cicero’s On invention and Rhetoric to Herennius, Quintilian’s Ars Oratoria, Schopenauer’s sarcastic pamphlet The Art of Being Right: Thirty-Eight Ways to Win an Argument, just to name a few specimens) or looking at their logical and dialectical underpinnings (besides Aristotle’s own work, Locke’s treatment of ad fallacies in An Essay Concerning Human Understanding,book III of Whately’s Elements of Logic and book Vof Mill’s A System of Logic, Ratiocinative and Inductive are all key references). Nor has this interest abated in recent times—quite the opposite, in fact. Since Hamblin’s seminal monograph Fallacies (1970), there has been a resurgence of studies on fallacious reasoning over http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy & Technology Springer Journals

Introduction: Theoretical and Technological Perspectives on Online Arguments

Philosophy & Technology , Volume 30 (2) – May 8, 2017

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht
Subject
Philosophy; Philosophy of Technology
ISSN
2210-5433
eISSN
2210-5441
DOI
10.1007/s13347-017-0264-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Philos. Technol. (2017) 30:131–135 DOI 10.1007/s13347-017-0264-4 EDITORIAL NOTE Introduction: Theoretical and Technological Perspectives on Online Arguments 1 2 Fabio Paglieri & Chris Reed Received: 28 April 2017 /Accepted: 3 May 2017 /Published online: 8 May 2017 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2017 Argumentation has been a topic of interest for philosophy since its very inception—not surprisingly, given that philosophical inquiry is first and foremost about the articulation of cogent arguments. Aristotle’s Sophistical Refutations offered the first in a long list of taxonomies of fallacious arguments throughout the history of philosophy, either with a focus on rhetorical aspects (Cicero’s On invention and Rhetoric to Herennius, Quintilian’s Ars Oratoria, Schopenauer’s sarcastic pamphlet The Art of Being Right: Thirty-Eight Ways to Win an Argument, just to name a few specimens) or looking at their logical and dialectical underpinnings (besides Aristotle’s own work, Locke’s treatment of ad fallacies in An Essay Concerning Human Understanding,book III of Whately’s Elements of Logic and book Vof Mill’s A System of Logic, Ratiocinative and Inductive are all key references). Nor has this interest abated in recent times—quite the opposite, in fact. Since Hamblin’s seminal monograph Fallacies (1970), there has been a resurgence of studies on fallacious reasoning over

Journal

Philosophy & TechnologySpringer Journals

Published: May 8, 2017

References