Introduction

Introduction Political Behavior, Vol. 23, No. 1, 2001 The four articles in this special issue nicely illustrate both the promise and the challenge in the comparative analysis of mass political phenomena. Two articles, by Ikeda and Huckfeldt and by Weisberg and Tanaka, represent sensi- tive extensions of earlier work by the U.S. collaborator. A third, by Blais and his colleagues, challenges all of us to get our measures right before we venture down the path of cross-national generalization. The fourth article, by Kim and Fording, is very clear about cross-national comparability but challenges us to think hard about microfoundations for macrophenomena. Indeed all four arti- cles do this. And all four focus on the competing forces for stability and change, an appropriate theme for the new millennium. Ikeda and Huckfeldt take Columbia global, so to speak. Where Huckfeldt has made elaboration on Columbia-school insights about social interaction and political behavior the leitmotiv of his career, this article extends the analysis to a social context in which interaction and perception may—emphasis on may—differ from that in deeply mined South Bend. The natural question is whether Japanese respondents perceive actual agreement and disagreement differently from U.S. respondents. Ikeda and Huckfeldt are careful http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Political Behavior Springer Journals

Introduction

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/introduction-nxpU1iKb8w
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 by Plenum Publishing Corporation
Subject
Political Science and International Relations; Political Science; Sociology, general
ISSN
0190-9320
eISSN
1573-6687
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1017684329835
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Political Behavior, Vol. 23, No. 1, 2001 The four articles in this special issue nicely illustrate both the promise and the challenge in the comparative analysis of mass political phenomena. Two articles, by Ikeda and Huckfeldt and by Weisberg and Tanaka, represent sensi- tive extensions of earlier work by the U.S. collaborator. A third, by Blais and his colleagues, challenges all of us to get our measures right before we venture down the path of cross-national generalization. The fourth article, by Kim and Fording, is very clear about cross-national comparability but challenges us to think hard about microfoundations for macrophenomena. Indeed all four arti- cles do this. And all four focus on the competing forces for stability and change, an appropriate theme for the new millennium. Ikeda and Huckfeldt take Columbia global, so to speak. Where Huckfeldt has made elaboration on Columbia-school insights about social interaction and political behavior the leitmotiv of his career, this article extends the analysis to a social context in which interaction and perception may—emphasis on may—differ from that in deeply mined South Bend. The natural question is whether Japanese respondents perceive actual agreement and disagreement differently from U.S. respondents. Ikeda and Huckfeldt are careful

Journal

Political BehaviorSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 3, 2004

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off