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Introduction

Introduction GIULIANA GEMELLI and ROY MACLEOD Since their beginnings in the early twentieth century, American founda- tions have operated in the world of public policy, mobilizing expertise to solve emerging problems along a spectrum of disciplines ranging from industrial relations and urban planning, to public health and social welfare. While maintaining the status of private institutions, they have blurred historical boundaries between public responsibility and private initiative, and have played an important role in shaping scientific, social and economic policies throughout the world. In Europe, the role of American foundations has been particularly significant. Beyond ‘supporting and honouring those whose actions they considered exemplary, as well as in sponsoring the creation of new, or the reorientation and reorganization of existing institutions’, they have served a number of interests. They have facilitated interaction between govern- ments and across cultural frontiers; they have served as ‘global’ bridges between East and West; and they have stimulated political, intellectual, and economic elites in co-operating with one another. Between the two world wars, and especially since the Second World War, American foundations have acted as catalysts and assessors, promoters and explorers – as agents of change, as well as patrons of research. Today, there is http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Minerva Springer Journals

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Social Sciences; Science and Technology Studies; Social Sciences, general; Higher Education
ISSN
0026-4695
eISSN
1573-1871
DOI
10.1023/A:1023680029762
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

GIULIANA GEMELLI and ROY MACLEOD Since their beginnings in the early twentieth century, American founda- tions have operated in the world of public policy, mobilizing expertise to solve emerging problems along a spectrum of disciplines ranging from industrial relations and urban planning, to public health and social welfare. While maintaining the status of private institutions, they have blurred historical boundaries between public responsibility and private initiative, and have played an important role in shaping scientific, social and economic policies throughout the world. In Europe, the role of American foundations has been particularly significant. Beyond ‘supporting and honouring those whose actions they considered exemplary, as well as in sponsoring the creation of new, or the reorientation and reorganization of existing institutions’, they have served a number of interests. They have facilitated interaction between govern- ments and across cultural frontiers; they have served as ‘global’ bridges between East and West; and they have stimulated political, intellectual, and economic elites in co-operating with one another. Between the two world wars, and especially since the Second World War, American foundations have acted as catalysts and assessors, promoters and explorers – as agents of change, as well as patrons of research. Today, there is

Journal

MinervaSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 7, 2004

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