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INTRAC’s Experience of Working with International NGOs on Aid Withdrawal and Exit Strategies from 2011 to 2016

INTRAC’s Experience of Working with International NGOs on Aid Withdrawal and Exit Strategies from... In recent years, the international development sector has been affected by major new dynamics in the global political economy, with significant shifts in the aid policies of many donor agencies and changes in funding patterns for recipient countries. This article offers insights into what researchers at INTRAC—a not-for-profit organisation which provides capacity building support to different types of civil society organisation around the world—have learned about the interests, priorities and strategies of international NGOs (INGOs) in relation to aid withdrawal and exit processes based on its experiences of promoting debate and supporting organisations over several years. We identify gaps in the evidence base, including the experience of partners, and changes needed in the policy and practice of INGOs to ensure that responsible exit planning becomes the norm rather than an exception. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png VOLUNTAS: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations Springer Journals

INTRAC’s Experience of Working with International NGOs on Aid Withdrawal and Exit Strategies from 2011 to 2016

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by International Society for Third-Sector Research and The Johns Hopkins University
Subject
Social Sciences; Social Sciences, general; Political Science; Social Policy
ISSN
0957-8765
eISSN
1573-7888
DOI
10.1007/s11266-017-9901-x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In recent years, the international development sector has been affected by major new dynamics in the global political economy, with significant shifts in the aid policies of many donor agencies and changes in funding patterns for recipient countries. This article offers insights into what researchers at INTRAC—a not-for-profit organisation which provides capacity building support to different types of civil society organisation around the world—have learned about the interests, priorities and strategies of international NGOs (INGOs) in relation to aid withdrawal and exit processes based on its experiences of promoting debate and supporting organisations over several years. We identify gaps in the evidence base, including the experience of partners, and changes needed in the policy and practice of INGOs to ensure that responsible exit planning becomes the norm rather than an exception.

Journal

VOLUNTAS: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit OrganizationsSpringer Journals

Published: Aug 24, 2017

References