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Information Quality

Information Quality Philos. Technol. (2013) 26:1–6 DOI 10.1007/s13347-013-0101-3 EDITOR LETTER Luciano Floridi Received: 31 January 2013 /Accepted: 31 January 2013 /Published online: 15 February 2013 # Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013 The most developed post-industrial societies live by information, and information and communication technologies keep them oxygenated (English 2009). So, the better the quality of the information exchanged, the more likely such societies and their members may prosper. But what is information quality (IQ) exactly? The question has become increasingly pressing in recent years. Yet, our answers have been less than satisfactory so far. In the USA, the Information Quality Act, also known as the Data Quality Act, enacted in 2000, left undefined virtually every key concept in the text. So, it required the Office of Management and Budget “to promulgate guidance to agencies ensuring the quality, objectivity, utility, and integrity of information (including statistical information) disseminated by Federal agencies”. Unsurprisingly, the guidelines have received much criticism and have been under review ever since. In the UK, some of the most sustained efforts in dealing with IQ issues have concerned the National Health Service (NHS). Already in 2001, the Kennedy Report acknowledged that: “All health care is information driven, so the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy & Technology Springer Journals

Information Quality

Philosophy & Technology , Volume 26 (1) – Feb 15, 2013

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 by Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht
Subject
Philosophy; Philosophy of Technology
ISSN
2210-5433
eISSN
2210-5441
DOI
10.1007/s13347-013-0101-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Philos. Technol. (2013) 26:1–6 DOI 10.1007/s13347-013-0101-3 EDITOR LETTER Luciano Floridi Received: 31 January 2013 /Accepted: 31 January 2013 /Published online: 15 February 2013 # Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013 The most developed post-industrial societies live by information, and information and communication technologies keep them oxygenated (English 2009). So, the better the quality of the information exchanged, the more likely such societies and their members may prosper. But what is information quality (IQ) exactly? The question has become increasingly pressing in recent years. Yet, our answers have been less than satisfactory so far. In the USA, the Information Quality Act, also known as the Data Quality Act, enacted in 2000, left undefined virtually every key concept in the text. So, it required the Office of Management and Budget “to promulgate guidance to agencies ensuring the quality, objectivity, utility, and integrity of information (including statistical information) disseminated by Federal agencies”. Unsurprisingly, the guidelines have received much criticism and have been under review ever since. In the UK, some of the most sustained efforts in dealing with IQ issues have concerned the National Health Service (NHS). Already in 2001, the Kennedy Report acknowledged that: “All health care is information driven, so the

Journal

Philosophy & TechnologySpringer Journals

Published: Feb 15, 2013

References