Hostile Behavior and Profit in Virtual Negotiation: a Meta-Analysis

Hostile Behavior and Profit in Virtual Negotiation: a Meta-Analysis Virtual negotiations are expected to differ from face-to-face negotiations in terms of both negotiator behavior and outcomes. Nonetheless, competing theories and mixed results characterize this literature. This paper meta-analytically reviews studies that compared face-to-face negotiation with virtual negotiation (e.g., audio, email/text, video-conferencing). Competing predictions from psychological distance theory and the barrier effect perspective were tested. Overall, results supported the psychological distance theory in that face-to-face negotiations were less hostile and resulted in higher profit than virtual negotiations. Three moderators (negotiation mode, anonymity in virtual negotiation, and further interaction within the experiment) were hypothesized to impact virtual negotiation. While some moderators were significant, they did not completely account for findings across all studies. Results and discussion provide a note of caution for individuals embracing e-business and conducting Internet negotiations as well as suggestions for future research. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Business and Psychology Springer Journals

Hostile Behavior and Profit in Virtual Negotiation: a Meta-Analysis

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.
Subject
Psychology; Industrial and Organizational Psychology; Community and Environmental Psychology; Personality and Social Psychology; Business and Management, general; Social Sciences, general
ISSN
0889-3268
eISSN
1573-353X
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10869-005-6984-y
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Virtual negotiations are expected to differ from face-to-face negotiations in terms of both negotiator behavior and outcomes. Nonetheless, competing theories and mixed results characterize this literature. This paper meta-analytically reviews studies that compared face-to-face negotiation with virtual negotiation (e.g., audio, email/text, video-conferencing). Competing predictions from psychological distance theory and the barrier effect perspective were tested. Overall, results supported the psychological distance theory in that face-to-face negotiations were less hostile and resulted in higher profit than virtual negotiations. Three moderators (negotiation mode, anonymity in virtual negotiation, and further interaction within the experiment) were hypothesized to impact virtual negotiation. While some moderators were significant, they did not completely account for findings across all studies. Results and discussion provide a note of caution for individuals embracing e-business and conducting Internet negotiations as well as suggestions for future research.

Journal

Journal of Business and PsychologySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 29, 2005

References

  • The influence of anger and compassion on negotiation performance
    Allred, K. G.; Mallozzi, J. S.; Matsui, F.; Raia, C. P.
  • Computer-mediated communication and structured interaction in transfer pricing negotiation
    *Arunachalam, V.; Dilla, W. N.

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